MD, PhD, FMedSci, FRSB, FRCP, FRCPEd.
James Orsen (Jim) Bakker is quite a character. Wiki informs us that he is an American televangelist and former Assemblies of God minister. With his former wife Tammy Faye he hosted the The PTL Club, an evangelical Christian television program from 1974 to 1989. He also developed Heritage USA, a now-defunct Christian theme park in Fort Mill, South Carolina.
A cover-up of hush money paid to a church secretary, Jessica Hahn, for an alleged rape led to his resignation from the ministry. Subsequent revelations of accounting fraud brought about his conviction on felony charges, imprisonment and divorce. Bakker later remarried and returned to televangelism, founding the Morningside Church in Blue Eye, Missouri. He currently hosts The Jim Bakker Show, which focuses on the end time and the Second Coming of Christ while promoting emergency survival products. He has written several books, including I Was Wrong and Time Has Come: How to Prepare Now for Epic Events Ahead.
The televangelist has recently taken to selling all sorts of stuff to his followers – anything from food buckets to water bottles to vitamins — and that includes his “Silver Solution,” which the pastor claims will get rid of “all venereal diseases.” 
But according to the Friendly Atheist, Bakker allowed a guest on his show to tell his followers an even more dangerous falsehood: that the colloidal silver concoction will also “deactivate” the coronavirus in under 12 hours.
Speaking with Dr. Sherrill Sellman on his show, Bakker said, “This influenza, that is now circling the globe, you’re saying that Silver Solution would be effective?” Sellman — who is not a medical doctor but “a naturopath who boasts of having ‘simple solutions to complex issues’” — replied, “Well, let’s say it hasn’t been tested on this strain of the coronavirus, but it’s been tested on other strains of the coronavirus and has been able to eliminate it within 12 hours.”

“Totally eliminates it. Kills it. Deactivates it,” she said. “And then it boosts your immune system, so then you can support the recovery, ’cause when you kill the virus then your immune system comes into action to clear it out. So you want a vibrant immune system as well as an ability to deactivate these viruses.”

In a test-tube, colloidal silver might kill the virus. But in a living organism?

No!

And there is plenty of evidence to show that, when taken by mouth, colloidal silver can have serious side effects. According to the National Institutes of Health, one of the most common effects is “argyria, a bluish-gray discoloration of the skin, which is usually permanent” (see ‘before/after pictures on the right).

Furthermore, it can also cause “poor absorption of some drugs, such as certain antibiotics and thyroxine (used to treat thyroid deficiency).”

Question: is it really ‘Christian’ to promote bogus treatments to desperate people?

14 Responses to Colloidal silver for coronavirus – as promoted by the televangelist Jim Bakker

  • Well… many people seem to consider it “Christian” to extract money from their fellow citizens.

  • Jim Bakker has always been bogus. “Bogus” is his product. Selling bogus treatments for financial gain is par for the course for him.

    Putting aside the God debate, if, by Christian, you mean is he a decent person? That would be an emphatic no. Isn’t, wasn’t, never will be. He is not just a fraudster (like chiropractors, homeopaths, naturopaths, etc.), he is a convicted fraudster.

  • Question: is it really ‘Christian’ to promote bogus treatments to desperate people?

    If you are an Evangelical “prosperity doctrine” Christian minister it is almost obligatory. How else will you be able to afford that new and bigger private jet?

  • Honestly, I am surprised it took this long for the CS quacks to come out into the open with their (carefully couched – after all, it hasn’t been tested specifically on THIS particular virus) claims. Sherrill Sellman paid attention during the marketing and business development portion of her Certified Traditional Naturopath education, that is obvious.

    A perusal of Bakker’s site shows that he sells lower-middle range storage foods at greatly inflated prices, along with mediocre quality gear that is focused on fears more that utilitarian value. His medical products consist of CS, hemp derivatives, and the odd B-vitamin supplement. IOW nothing needing a medical license or proper education to deal in.

    In answer to the stated question, no. There is nothing “Christian” about marketing snake oil to people in desperate straights. Jim Bakker is a modern day Pharisee, nothing more.

  • Quote: “is it really ‘Christian’ to promote bogus treatments to desperate people?”

    I consider it unfortunate when “Christian” is used as a synonym for “moral” or “ethical” (even if used in brackets).
    Belief in supernatural entities has per se nothing to do with an ethical, humanistic mind-set. Of course, many religious people are “good”, ethical persons. But the same is true for many non-religious atheists.

    From an anti-theistic standpoint, the provocative answer to the question would be:
    Bogus “treatments” (e.g. exorcism), absurd rituals (e.g. prayer), and exploitation of desperate people (often very poor and uneducated, e.g. in third world countries) have long traditions and can be considered core elements of most religions, Christianity included.
    So: yes.

  • “The Old Testament is history become myth…the New Testament is myth become history”. (Nietzsche).
    Christianity’s first bogus treatment was given to history. It’s second was to reason. The Jim Bakkers of the world are simply following the lead…too stupid, too entrenched or to well heeled to break ranks. A lot like Chiroquackery, homeopathetic and inaccurate-puncture practitioners.

    • Dear Michael Kenny,
      Quote:” “The Old Testament is history become myth…the New Testament is myth become history”. (Nietzsche).“

      Do you have a reference for the Nietzsche quote? I would like to read it in German. Maybe there´s something “lost in translation”, because it sounds really stupid to me.

      Since when are the stories from the Old Testament even remotely based on history?!
      For example, let´s take the Exodus, one of the most important stories of the OT. Even the majority of bible scholars today agree that this is just another myth and does not describe an historic event. The whole story is not supported by any archaeological evidence, which would certainly be present if the story was true.

  • Is it Christian? Just try to find in the New Testament how much charged Jesus or his apostels for their healing…and it sure was kind of alternative medicine, too 😉

  • Homeopathy has been very popular with the Queen & the German people for a long time to treat more minor ailments. They of course would choose traditional surgery & therapies for serious complaints.

    Homeopathy worked for my younger son’s eczema & even for our rescue pet dog who had digestive & chronic diarrhoea issues.

    I have found herbals like echinacea efficacious in warding off colds & alleviating flu symptons.

    After having Lymes the doctors eventually, after a blood test proved positive, prescribed Doxycycline which helped but afterwards I consulted free of charge a top herbalist in Cornwall who prescribed herbs which enabled a full recovery & return to my former energies, as I was still experiencing lethargy & some ague.

    • perhaps you ought to inform yourself about the difference between evidence and experience
      https://edzardernst.com/2012/11/what-is-and-what-isnt-clinical-evidence-and-why-is-the-distinction-important/

    • @Veronica Bendall

      Homeopathy worked for my younger son’s eczema & even for our rescue pet dog who had digestive & chronic diarrhoea issues.

      I have found herbals like echinacea efficacious in warding off colds & alleviating flu symptons.

      Remove the power of the mind (placebo effect) and the power of time (the result would have happened over time, anyway) and you have little foundation left upon which to support your claims, I’m afraid.

      Water and sugar pills (homeopathy’s go-to-treatments) may cure your thirst and satisfy a sweet tooth, respectively, but that’s about it.

    • @Veronica Bendall

      You wrote

      Homeopathy has been very popular with the Queen & the German people for a long time to treat more minor ailments. They of course would choose traditional surgery & therapies for serious complaints.

      Perhaps you’ll be kind enough to spell out for me where the borderline lies between “minor ailments” and “serious complaints”. I’ve asked this question many times before without ever getting a straight answer. Let’s get specific — we spend too much time on these threads uselessly hurling around insults instead of discussing specifics.

      Here’s a list of diseases homeopaths claim to be able to “treat”, “help” or “cure”. They all appear in a Wikipedia list of incurable diseases. The list is in alphabetical order. Which of them do you regard as a “serious complaint”, so I’ll know not to consult a homeopath if I’m seeking a cure.

      Ankylosing spondylitis, arthritis, asthma, Crohn’s disease, cystic fibrosis, diabetes (types 1 and 2), epilepsy, glioblastoma, leukemia(s), macular degeneration, muscular dystrophy, Parkinson’s disease, polycystic ovary syndrome, pre-eclampsia, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, schizophrenia, Tourette’s syndrome.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

If you want to be able to edit your comment for five minutes after you first submit it, you will need to tick the box: “Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.”
Recent Comments

Note that comments can be edited for up to five minutes after they are first submitted but you must tick the box: “Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.”

The most recent comments from all posts can be seen here.

Archives
Categories