MD, PhD, FMedSci, FRSB, FRCP, FRCPEd.

The 30 most recent comments from all posts are listed below. Click on the post title to go to the comment on the post’s page.

  • Comment by Edzard on How do proponents of so-called alternative medicine react to criticism? Tuesday 28 January 2020: 21:01 wrong again, Roger: https://edzardernst.com/2019/09/__trashed-3/
  • Comment by Edzard on Coronavirus epidemic: Why don’t they ask the homeopaths for help? Tuesday 28 January 2020: 21:01 thank you of reminding us of these long-debunked papers
  • Comment by Edzard on Netflix, Goop, and quacks in our post-truth society Tuesday 28 January 2020: 21:01 thank you for amusing us again with you delusions; may I call you THE DELUSIONIST?
  • Comment by RG on Netflix, Goop, and quacks in our post-truth society Tuesday 28 January 2020: 20:01 @Dr. JMK & Richard Rasker Richard I appreciate the reply, but the content or your response missed the mark completely. You offered nothing new to what has been said here previously about SBM. I myself do not attempt to promote any particular alternative therapies, but I do take pleasure in pointing out the failures of SBM, for they are many. Do we throw SBM out the window completely ? ... I think not. You and others will claim that SBM corrects itself when possible. May I point out that there has been no correction to the over prescribing of medications. To only acknowledge a problem is not a solution. MD's are still over-prescribing seniors, and it's a terrible problem. SBM need to fix it !! Dr. JMK As usual, you made a fine rebuttal post. I did not realize that you Dr. are on so many medications. I do understand that in the case of fighting cancers, more meds might be required. I hope you stay in the best possible of health, with or without the medications. That said, the article I linked made no mention of fighting the chronic illness of cancer, but did mention many other chronic illness specifically. I suspect you own experience causes you to see things in light of your own situation. I'm not sure what you meant when you stated that the "USA might be catching up to the rest of the world". I ask you, who will turn around this serious over-prescribing of prescription medications ? Will hospitals .... no, MD's.... no, Pharmaceutical Corporations.... no, will the ill patient ? .... perhaps yes. However, not without the insight and the confidence to say no to their own MD's. I hold little confidence the this issue will be rectified any time soon. Clearly the vast majority of patients are not even aware of the seriousness of the problem, much less a solution. One superior solution will be found in better health. Ill patients need to live lifestyles that promote better health so that medications to treat symptoms are not necessary. As long as patients go to MD's seeking a solution for a problem or pain, MD's will continue treating the symptoms by prescribing meds. Why ?? .... because heath care is a business (YES- that applies for CAM also), and also because they have few actual cures. The cure lies in the patient making lifestyle choices to provide themselves with better health.
  • Comment by Matthew Henson on ‘Reiki distant healing’ … has now been scientifically proven !?!? Tuesday 28 January 2020: 19:01 Supposing some other study showed distance Reiki to have an effect I would be concerned that there might be interaction with the (also benign) influences of Yogic Flying. Will the new 5G mobile phone network interfere with these mysterious forces. It took a long time before gravity waves were detected and I accept that there is much we don't understand about ourselves. I will put Reiki into the special drawer marked Uttabollox though I would be happy to listen to new evidence.
  • Comment by Matthew Henson on Netflix, Goop, and quacks in our post-truth society Tuesday 28 January 2020: 19:01 Goop's business model seems to be based on trolling: making silly statements and harvesting money from the gullible. I suspect their success is partly to do with weaknesses in mainstream medicine, some very simple - British GPs tend to offer ten minute appointments whereas a homeopath might offer an hour-long consultation, some more difficult. Even I as a layman know that medical research has a replication problem (like psychology) and through the work of Ioannides and others that much published research is wrong. Rich companies spend money to promote dubious ideas (Coca Cola will tell you sugar is fine if you exercise enough, Gatorade spent a fortune claiming dehydration in exercise was a risk while people died of exercise-associated hyponatremia). I think the solution can only be to do medicine better. Human factors are amenable to improvement. One has to be a science nerd to get into medical training, but even nerds can learn to try to create a connection with they people they look after. I don't think there is much to gain by shouting at the deluded. As with (eg) Trump or vaccine refusal that has little effect.
  • Comment by Marie on Coronavirus epidemic: Why don’t they ask the homeopaths for help? Tuesday 28 January 2020: 18:01 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20674839 https://www.ecampnd.com/homeopathy/A_Chorus_of_Fifty_in_Harmony.pdf
  • Comment by Roger on How do proponents of so-called alternative medicine react to criticism? Tuesday 28 January 2020: 17:01 The vast majority of "They/Them" ignore you. Those that get upset are the self-selecting set that you become aware of. You cant generalize about all of "they/them". Probably no more or less sensitive to criticism than any heterogeneous group of people.
  • Comment by Dr Julian Money-Kyrle on Netflix, Goop, and quacks in our post-truth society Tuesday 28 January 2020: 13:01 RG, During my medical training in the 1980's I was taught about the dangers of polypharmacy (the prescribing of many drugs) and I have always tried to rationalise the drug charts of patients that came my way (provided that this did not involve straying too far beyond my areas of expertise). The article that you have linked to suggests that perhaps the US is starting to catch up with the rest of the world now. Unfortunately in oncology it is often necessary to prescribe a lot of drugs together to deal with the effects of chemotherapy etc. or to enable it to be given in the first place. For most of these it simply isn't safe to wait and see if the patient can manage without them. I am now on the receiving end of this myself with 15 different prescription drugs (not counting the ones I have when I come in for hospital treatment), all of which are there for good reasons. But I do think very often doctors add their own prescription without giving enough thought to what their colleagues might already have done, and it is not always easy for a GP to go against the recommendations of a specialist.
  • Comment by Richard Rasker on Netflix, Goop, and quacks in our post-truth society Tuesday 28 January 2020: 10:01 @RG Since you appear to insist on an answer from me, I'll give you one - and it's basically the same that I gave Roger, with some elaborations that I offered on previous occasions as well. Yes, real medicine isn't perfect. It makes quite a few mistakes, and I recently experienced one such mistake myself. And I'm sorry to hear that your family also suffered as a result of medical mistakes and imperfections. BUT: - If you really believe that the answer is to abandon and denounce science-based medicine, you are one seriously ill-informed person. The best approach of course is to try and improve the weak points, while maintaining the progress that real medicine has made so far. No, this isn't easy at all. As I said before: medicine may well be one of the most difficult things we humans do, and this means that mistakes and imperfections are almost unavoidable. The good news is that many smart people spend their whole lives working to improve this, and that things are improving, albeit often slowly. - And if you think that real medicine being not perfect means that we should instead embrace utter nonsense, quackery and things that have been made up on the spot, you are not merely ill-informed, but an absolute idiot. And this is where my answer ends, because in my experience, it is nigh impossible to reason with people like you in a sensible manner. Your comments appear to be motivated solely by emotions and overwhelmingly negative sentiments with regard to real medicine, and so far are devoid of reason and even realism. Have a nice life, and I hope that one day you will realize after all that doctors and medical scientists are doing quite a bit better than you choose to believe right now.
  • Comment by Mojo on Netflix, Goop, and quacks in our post-truth society Tuesday 28 January 2020: 09:01 @Björn Geir Not necessarily, he might just be misrepresenting it.
  • Comment by Richard Rasker on Do cancer patients need chiropractors? Tuesday 28 January 2020: 08:01 @DC can cancer suffers benefit from a course of manual therapy addressing the MSK system? No, as in: not more than they can benefit from a pleasant outing, or a visit to the hairdresser's or a massage parlour, or whatever else makes someone feel good. It is simply a matter of positive/negative balance: on the positive side, chiropractic offers no medical benefits over ordinary massage or physiotherapy. On the negative side, it is strongly associated with pseudoscience, unnecessary (and sometimes even quite harmful) 'treatments', and medical incompetence (a.k.a. quackery). In my book, this means that chiropractic has an overall negative balance, and should therefore be abandoned in favour of less controversial treatments with comparable benefits.
  • Comment by Richard Rawlins on Do cancer patients need chiropractors? Tuesday 28 January 2020: 07:01 Answer: “Yes, any patient with a MSK issue might benefit from “manual therapy” (I’ve just had a massage - nice), but that is not the issue. An even better question is “why get a chiropractor to do the ‘manual therapy’ and not an osteopath or PT?” “What is the USP of chiropractic? And the evidence for any answer asserted?”
  • Comment by DC on Do cancer patients need chiropractors? Monday 27 January 2020: 22:01 need? no. A better question would be...can cancer suffers benefit from a course of manual therapy addressing the MSK system? But of course, by using the word "need" he set up the discussion to a scenario which is so strict that it's actually a stupid question, which he tends to do.
  • Comment by Edzard on Data fabrication in China is an ‘open secret’ Monday 27 January 2020: 21:01 further evidence of data fabrication: https://forbetterscience.com/2020/01/24/the-full-service-paper-mill-and-its-chinese-customers/amp/?__twitter_impression=true
  • Comment by Björn Geir on Netflix, Goop, and quacks in our post-truth society Monday 27 January 2020: 19:01 As exemplified by a narcissistic clown in high office, reasonable ridicule seems not to hinder perilous gain in popularity.
  • Comment by Björn Geir on Netflix, Goop, and quacks in our post-truth society Monday 27 January 2020: 19:01 Did you read the story you linked to? Wrong question. Did you ‘understand’ the story? Evidently not.
  • Comment by Richard Rasker on Do cancer patients need chiropractors? Monday 27 January 2020: 19:01 Do cancer patients need chiropractors? Do fish need bicycles?
  • Comment by Ron Jette on Netflix, Goop, and quacks in our post-truth society Monday 27 January 2020: 17:01 @Jonathan Jarry And I knew that! Damn. Please accept my apologies. All of them. I think I had Joe top of mind for other reasons. Great article, by the way. Thanks, again.
  • Comment by Jonathan Jarry on Netflix, Goop, and quacks in our post-truth society Monday 27 January 2020: 16:01 Just to correct the record: Joe did not write the article. I did. Thank you!
  • Comment by Edzard on Coronavirus epidemic: Why don’t they ask the homeopaths for help? Monday 27 January 2020: 16:01 and the moon could be of Cheddar cheese - Whoa!!
  • Comment by R. Guerreiro on Coronavirus epidemic: Why don’t they ask the homeopaths for help? Monday 27 January 2020: 16:01 Would be fun to compare homeopathy with traditional Chinese medicine.. 🙂
  • Comment by RG on Coronavirus epidemic: Why don’t they ask the homeopaths for help? Monday 27 January 2020: 16:01 Whoa !! The professor could be a fraud ? .... no way
  • Comment by Ron Jette on Netflix, Goop, and quacks in our post-truth society Monday 27 January 2020: 15:01 @RG Paranoia ??? is that the best you’ve got ? This reminds me of the movie, Monty Python and the Holy Grai,l where the Black Knight has had all his limbs lopped off and he is bouncing around on the forest floor, wanting to fight, still thinking he is invincible. You're a funny man/woman/alien/child/knight (or whatever you are), RG.
  • Comment by Edzard on Coronavirus epidemic: Why don’t they ask the homeopaths for help? Monday 27 January 2020: 15:01 do you want my fingerprints too?
  • Comment by A. Gärtner on Coronavirus epidemic: Why don’t they ask the homeopaths for help? Monday 27 January 2020: 15:01 Dear Prof. Dr Edzard Ernst, the last time I talked with Dr. Artur Wölfel (https://www.krankenhaus-naturheilweisen.de/krankenhaus-fuer-naturheilweisen/team/aerzte/), he confirmed they searched and did not find any evidence that you ever took courses or education at that hospital. So being asked several times about your connection to his hospital, he would be pleased to hear from you if and when you were trained there. So I am glad to hear you are in sane condition and probably be able to remember those details. Best regards
  • Comment by DC on Do cancer patients need chiropractors? Monday 27 January 2020: 14:01 Can/do DPTs address low back pain in cancer patients (for example)? Use their evidence.
  • Comment by Edzard on Coronavirus epidemic: Why don’t they ask the homeopaths for help? Monday 27 January 2020: 14:01 thank you! I was beginning to think I was the only sane person left
  • Comment by Steve Tonkin on Coronavirus epidemic: Why don’t they ask the homeopaths for help? Monday 27 January 2020: 14:01 This thread really is the gift that keeps on giving: I’ve seen miracles using homeopathy Dr Edzard Ernst is the Professorized Anti-Homeopath Homoeopathy had established in the world giving a magical performance in epidemics 100-200 years ago SBM kills by action Classical medicine has nothing to offer in viral diseases! Maybe the entire virus scare is a another massive fraud, Hopefully is this a wakeup call to use and trust homeopathy, it will safe lots of people! It’s very painful to see the remarks “placebo” for homeopathic remedies. Verily, they indeed walk among us.
  • Comment by Steve Tonkin on Coronavirus epidemic: Why don’t they ask the homeopaths for help? Monday 27 January 2020: 14:01 @Jane, you wrote: Do your own experiment, I challenge you to take 3 remedies, one at a time . Once a day for 2 weeks until you feel an effect. Then stop it and take it again to see if you get that same symptom again . Then you will know the remedy has a power you just don’t understand but you know it is there. Your sensations don’t lie!I've got a better idea. I'll send you three "remedies", unopened (hence uncontaminated) but with the labels removed and replaced with A, B, C. You identify them from the symptoms that you think they induce in you.
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