MD, PhD, FMedSci, FRSB, FRCP, FRCPEd.

The 30 most recent comments from all posts are listed below. Click on the post title to go to the comment on the post’s page.

  • Comment by David B on Has homeopathy caused the dramatic decline of COVID-19 cases in India? Sunday 18 April 2021: 09:04 According to Reuters news agency, India’s capital, New Delhi, is “under seige” from Covid-10″ – “The cases are rising very rapidly. The beds are filling fast” https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/world/indias-capital-under-siege-from-covid-19-seeks-emergency-help-from-federal-govt/ar-BB1fLHRT?ocid=msedgdhp So much for homeopathic prophylaxis in India. Since, in the minds of many homeopaths, correlation proves causation, clearly the increased availability of homeopathy in India must be responsible for this dramatic rise in cases.
  • Comment by David B on Has homeopathy caused the dramatic decline of COVID-19 cases in India? Sunday 18 April 2021: 09:04 According to The Independent online newspaper just under an hour ago, Covid-19 cases in India “are now skyrocketing” https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/world/this-is-a-catastrophe-india-looked-like-it-had-beaten-covid-but-cases-are-now-skyrocketing/ar-BB1fKHr5?ocid=msedgdhp Has homeopathy caused this dramatic increase? (I don’t think so, but I don’t think homeopathy caused the earlier decrease, either!)
  • Comment by Edzard on German homeopathy has just reached a new low Sunday 18 April 2021: 06:04 https://edzardernst.com/2020/10/homeopathy-prolongs-survival-of-lung-cancer-patients-can-it-be-true/
  • Comment by Dana Ullman on German homeopathy has just reached a new low Sunday 18 April 2021: 02:04 Dodgy study? Yeah…you HATE those randomized, double-blind, and placebo controlled trials…and you especially hate those well-controlled trials published in respected conventional medical journals that just happen to show benefits from homeopathic medicines. But somehow, you like it when such studies don’t show beneficial effects. What’s wrong with this picture? So much for this lame effort for scientific objectivity!
  • Comment by David B on Has homeopathy caused the dramatic decline of COVID-19 cases in India? Saturday 17 April 2021: 23:04 Dr. John Campbell in Cumbria, UK, has been posting regulat YouTube commentaries on Covid-19. His comments yesterday on the rising infection rate in India are interesting: https://youtu.be/_jFYrpAkQwA
  • Comment by Edzard on German homeopathy has just reached a new low Saturday 17 April 2021: 17:04 not a ‘spin master’ – I made a mistake. I thought HH was referring to his only paper in homeopathy as he usually does and did not even open the link. in fact, he is referring to the dodgy study by Frass. MY APOLOGIES
  • Comment by Dana Ullman on German homeopathy has just reached a new low Saturday 17 April 2021: 16:04 Oh Eddie…are you now calling Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind three-armed, multicenter studies to be “case reports.” Wow…you are the ultimate spin-master. Do you have your own dictionary too? What degree does one need to get to make up your own reality like you do?
  • Comment by Edzard on German homeopathy has just reached a new low Saturday 17 April 2021: 13:04 are you having a bad day? overdosed on Arnica? I don’t understand a word you say. is HHH you? and what has your case report got to do with evidence?
  • Comment by Dr. Heinrich Hümmer on German homeopathy has just reached a new low Saturday 17 April 2021: 13:04 So I hope you live a long time and will become even more wise to recognize that “the fellow homeopathy fanatic” is HHH, who is anything but fanatic [and you knows this!] and even proves you right about some things, but maybe like you is a little bit right about some things … ..May I note that, on the contrary, evidence significantly shifts towards homeopathy with carefully prepared placebo-controlled studies…. Homeopathic Treatment as an Add‐On Therapy May Improve Quality of Life and Prolong Survival in Patients with Non‐Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo‐Controlled, Double‐Blind, Three‐Arm, Multicenter Study https://theoncologist.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/onco.13548
  • Comment by Edzard on German homeopathy has just reached a new low Saturday 17 April 2021: 11:04 you are welcome, Heinrich. I am glad you found this website of a fellow homeopathy fanatic. however, you must remember a few things: 1) the quotes do not provide the full context; it’s better to read the full article. 2) it does not claim that homeopathy has been proven. 3) it points out that critics of homeopathy often make avoidable mistakes; a point that I have made also on this blog. 4) in > 20 years, the evidence has significantly shifted against homeopathy. 5) and finally, perhaps I have become a little wiser too?
  • Comment by Dr. Heinrich Hümmer on German homeopathy has just reached a new low Saturday 17 April 2021: 10:04 “The person in question, Dr. Lübbers, is an ENT specialist and, like all other German critics of homeopathy (apart from one, Dr. Grams) [and you and Dr. Aust], does not understand homeopathy.” THANK YOU; EDZARD, FOR MENTIONING THIS TRUE STATEMENT! It seems as if when you were younger, you could see clearer and LESS DEALED…. https://homoeopathiewirkt.wordpress.com/2020/01/09/edzard-ernst-and-his-homeopathy/
  • Comment by John Badanes on Energy healing decreases preoperative anxiety? No, not true! Friday 16 April 2021: 18:04 Your mention of the popularity of “energy medicine” with nurses reminds me of a meeting I had with a hospital director who contacted me because of my experience as a chiropractor and acupuncturist …and alt-med generally. He explained that many of the nurses were doing Reiki Therapy on the patients and expressed an interest in expanding the role of in-house alt-med. I asked him if he had any concerns about any liability issues that might arise as a result of all the Reiki therapy being used in the hospital. After all, I explained, since you have no idea how “energy medicine” works and what the therapy is doing, you really won’t be able to defend yourself when a patient BLAMES the Reiki Therapy for anything that goes south during their treatment. After all, I added, if you argue all that hand-waving couldn’t _possibly_ do anything as your defense, then you have bigger problems letting all your nurses get their healing fantasies all over the hospital carpet. He looked at me like I had just taken off my clothes and jumped in a cactus. ~TEO.
  • Comment by Dr Julian Money-Kyrle on Viracid: boosting the immune system or the manufacturer’s profit? Friday 16 April 2021: 08:04 Why do you argue with positive results? Nobody is arguing with positive results, but neither has anyone produced any so far. Viracid works for me. It has helped tremendously with allergy symptoms. It is not very clear to me what you mean by this. Are you saying, for instance, that you have gone from six hospital admissions a year for asthma to none, or that you don’t get a runny nose as often as you remember getting in the past, or that you have a rash that comes and goes randomly which you have self-diagnosed as an allergy? Allergies come and go for reasons that aren’t at all clear, symptoms can vary in severity and exposure to allergens is seldom constant from one episode to another. It is clear that you have formed a belief that Viracid works for you. However, while that might be sufficient to convince your friends to try it I hope you can understand that your beliefs are not really robust evidence of anything. I am not a scientist. You don’t have to be a scientist in order to apply scientific thinking. What scientists do is to ask themselves questions along the lines of: “How do I know? Could I be wrong? What if there is another explanation? How certain am I?” Another useful approach to help gauge the strength of your belief is: “How much am I prepared to stake on being correct?” For instance, would you be prepared to invest your life savings in this product? If there were a possibility that your symptoms indicated a more serious underlying problem would you continue to use the it rather than see your doctor? If there were a heavy fine for posting misinformation on the Internet, are you certain enough of your beliefs that you would go ahead anyway? Supposing somebody decided on the basis of your post to use the product instead of getting vaccinated, would you be happy to take responsibility for the consequences? Questioning your own beliefs is a good habit to get into and can be very helpful in avoiding bad decisions.
  • Comment by john travis on Energy healing decreases preoperative anxiety? No, not true! Friday 16 April 2021: 08:04 yes more highly implausible tosh being subjected to “scientific” scrutiny. For some unknown reason this particular kind of nonsense is very popular among nurses who really ought to know better. I wonder if that was the case here as it occurred in a hospital setting? I wonder how one might go about bringing more scepticism to bear upon nurses’ thinking?
  • Comment by john travis on No evidence that spinal manipulation improves immune function Friday 16 April 2021: 08:04 @ prl it is very difficult is not impossible to prove a negative. e.g. my earlier comment about Bertrand Russel’s tiny teapot in orbit around the sun that is just too small to be seen by even the most powerful telescope…….. but if the assertion is just too implausible and silly in the first place and in any event is unfalsifiable…..
  • Comment by Lenny on Viracid: boosting the immune system or the manufacturer’s profit? Friday 16 April 2021: 07:04 Your personal anecdotes are the lowest form of evidence, Ann. That’s why we pay them little heed. You’d understand that if you were a scientist.
  • Comment by prl on No evidence that spinal manipulation improves immune function Friday 16 April 2021: 02:04 no clinical evidence was found to support or refute claims Is that enough to fix that part of the conclusion? 😉
  • Comment by Ann Pierson on Viracid: boosting the immune system or the manufacturer’s profit? Friday 16 April 2021: 01:04 I am not a scientist. Viracid works for me. It has helped tremendously with allergy symptoms. I take it as directed. Why do you argue with positive results? You’re ‘scientific’ diagnosis is so odd because you dispute real results.
  • Comment by Pete Attkins on Battlefield acupuncture: “no significant efficacy” Thursday 15 April 2021: 22:04 “The ADE 651 is a fake bomb detector[1] produced by the British company Advanced Tactical Security & Communications Ltd (ATSC). Its manufacturer claimed it could detect bombs, guns, ammunition, and more from kilometers away. However, it was a scam, and the device was little more than a dowsing rod. The device was sold for up to US$60,000 each, despite costing almost nothing to produce. It was widely used in the Middle East, and may have led to numerous deadly bombings in Iraq due to its inability to detect explosives. Its inventor, James McCormick, was sentenced to 10 years in prison in 2013 for fraud.” https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/ADE_651
  • Comment by Richard Rasker on Battlefield acupuncture: “no significant efficacy” Thursday 15 April 2021: 21:04 Yup, the ADE-651, containing nothing more sophisticated than a generic anti-theft tag. And yes, it was basically a dowsing rod with a swivelling antenna – and a $ 40,000 price tag, that is.
  • Comment by Dr Julian Money-Kyrle on Battlefield acupuncture: “no significant efficacy” Thursday 15 April 2021: 18:04 it can be amazingly easy to sell crazy things (systems, instruments, training, etc. ) to organizations Wasn’t there some kind of bomb-detection device that was sold to the Israeli army about ten years ago that was essentially a black box with no functioning parts supposedly working on the principles of dousing?
  • Comment by john travis on No evidence that spinal manipulation improves immune function Thursday 15 April 2021: 13:04 there was never any prior plausibility for this absurdly silly notion in the first place. we did not NEED any studies to figure this out. What would the mechanism even be? There is not even much evidence that SMT works very well for low back pain – why on earth it should have ANY effects on immune function or any other organ systems in the body is quite beyond me or any other person with half a brain surely? all this has even been is a daft belief in “magical thinking” which is how Chiropractic was dreamt up in the first place. And it buys into the dreams Chiros have of extending their role into all others areas of healthcare – even fantasizing that they can be “primary healthcare providers.” All of which is just some very sick joke. just because people can come up with daft notions doesn’t mean we have to do a “study” to refute them. Bertrand Russel came up with his “teapot” in orbit around the sun as an analogy for this as did Carl Sagan with his invisible “dragon” in his garage – one can make such things impossible to refute but are they of any use? They are also thereby unfalsifiable and scientifically absurd. BTW there was much talk on this blog recently of the low case rate in India being due the the use of AYUSH in particular homeopathy – please note that India now has the second highest rate of daily cases IN THE WORLD having overtaken even BRAZIL! 161,000 odd cases per day and hospitals and ICUs being overwhelmed. Many hospitals are just dumping the dead bodies outside as they cannot cope with disposals. All of this is being reported to be as a result of the almost total relaxation of PPE/ distancing measures with large crowds congregating and mixing and folk abandoning masks and other precautions. https://www.cnbc.com/2021/04/12/coronavirus-india-becomes-second-worst-hit-country-as-covid-cases-surge.html perhaps I KRISHNA can explain why homeopathy is no longer working so well? presumably they have also stopped taking the silly little pills as well……….
  • Comment by Richard Rawlins on No evidence that spinal manipulation improves immune function Thursday 15 April 2021: 10:04 “There is no clinical evidence to support claims that SMT is efficacious or effective in changing immune system outcomes. Further studies in this area are not warranted.”
  • Comment by Jeroen Staring on No evidence that spinal manipulation improves immune function Thursday 15 April 2021: 10:04 And what about somebody who writes about SCAM who is the daughter/son of a chiropractor who was the family’s provider? She/he would perhaps not have been among us if not… How many generations do we have to consider?
  • Comment by Richard Rasker on Battlefield acupuncture: “no significant efficacy” Wednesday 14 April 2021: 19:04 That’s why I’m trying to sell battlefield voodoo kits: for each soldier, there’s a set of needles (which can double as acupuncture needles) and a dolly. When the enemy approaches, they whip out their dolls and stab the enemy’s effigy with one or more needles.
  • Comment by Dr Julian Money-Kyrle on Battlefield acupuncture: “no significant efficacy” Wednesday 14 April 2021: 18:04 $5.4 million is petty cash when it comes to defense budgets.
  • Comment by Richard Rasker on Battlefield acupuncture: “no significant efficacy” Wednesday 14 April 2021: 12:04 Somehow, ‘battlefield acupuncture’ calls up images of people going at each other with pikes and bayonets and suchlike. Reasonably effective in a way, but not for healing purposes …
  • Comment by jrkrideau on Battlefield acupuncture: “no significant efficacy” Wednesday 14 April 2021: 11:04 Somehow telling a possibly armed seriously injured soldier that their pain treatment will be a couple of needles in the ear may not be all that advisable. As Les Rose points out it can be amazingly easy to sell crazy things (systems, instruments, training, etc. ) to organizations. There are some rear horror stories in the police field.
  • Comment by Les Rose on Battlefield acupuncture: “no significant efficacy” Wednesday 14 April 2021: 10:04 I am not surprised that the US military fell for this. After all, they had men who stared at goats. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Men_Who_Stare_at_Goats
  • Comment by Karen E Sutton on Chiropractic: Not All That It’s Cracked Up to Be Tuesday 13 April 2021: 21:04 Dear Dr. Epstein: I hope that you tell your patients about radiation risks, so they can be fully informed. I went to a chiropractor for “sore neck from heavy lifting” (I had a tight muscle, and no more) and he did not examine me at all, just led me to the X-ray room, where he took 3 spinals, and two of my open mouth and upper from under the chin. The radiation I was exposed to during his “bait and switch” initial consultation will be with me for years. And he charged me $280, and gave me no adjustment at that visit. Do you educate your patients beforehand about the medically proven risks of all of that radiation poisoning to a patient? The cumulative effect? I am thinking no, since that kind of information would make all of your patients walk out the door.
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