MD, PhD, FMedSci, FRSB, FRCP, FRCPEd.

The 30 most recent comments from all posts are listed below. Click on the post title to go to the comment on the post’s page.

  • Comment by Björn Geir on Individualised (traditional) herbalism: best avoided, in my view Thursday 20 June 2019: 18:06 I already informed you that it was my physician that alerted me to the dangers of pills, so why is it nonsense Good doctor. Tell her from me to continue taking good care of you. I hope you won't give her too hard time when she needs to prescribe powerful medicine for you with many side effects. As we all know, most medicines (real ones that is) are dangerous, not the least when they are used wrongly. Good doctors know how to use medicines with care, when to look for those risks and when and how to monitor the patient for signs of danger when needed. They also know how to inform and advise their patients.
  • Comment by RG on Individualised (traditional) herbalism: best avoided, in my view Thursday 20 June 2019: 17:06 Lenny You're way off topic, and saying just stupid things
  • Comment by Lenny on Individualised (traditional) herbalism: best avoided, in my view Thursday 20 June 2019: 16:06 @RG Tell that to the people on the ground who have been killed when aircraft have crashed. Hasn’t happened with magic carpets.
  • Comment by Ron Jette on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Thursday 20 June 2019: 16:06 VAERS tracks vaccine injuries like I track polar bears. Not very well. bit.ly/SkepDoc_VAERS
  • Comment by Edzard on Individualised (traditional) herbalism: best avoided, in my view Thursday 20 June 2019: 15:06 are you competing for the stupidest comment of the month?
  • Comment by Iresine on Evidence-based chiropractic education would mean that students cannot become chiropractors Thursday 20 June 2019: 15:06 As far as I know the UCO does not teach cranial and visceral osteopathy at undergraduate level. They never did unlike other osteopathic schools in the UK.
  • Comment by RG on Individualised (traditional) herbalism: best avoided, in my view Thursday 20 June 2019: 14:06 Lenny That is not a defense. You continue to resort to the cliche when you don't have a better answer. The truth is that you can not die from flying if you don't get in the airplane. Don't eat the meds.
  • Comment by Bart B. Van Bockstaele on HOMEOPATHY IN FRANCE: Cure cancer with homeopathy? “Let’s get real. We are doctors.” Thursday 20 June 2019: 13:06 I think it is clear that quackery is slowly losing support from official organisations. In Belgium, a so-called osteopath was just convicted for killing a 14-year-old girl by treating her with homœopathics: https://www.vrt.be/vrtnws/nl/2019/06/20/osteopaat-die-14-jarig-meisje-doodde-krijgt-celstraf-met-uitstel/ He still didn't get much more than a slap on the wrist though: he has to pay 6000 euros and got a two-year suspended prison sentence. Nonetheless, given where we are coming from, there seems to be reason for hope.
  • Comment by Osteopathie Praxis im Klinikum Karlsruhe on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Thursday 20 June 2019: 13:06 I guess that there is enough experience with ADR reporting systems. Therefore the reporting system for AMTR Adverse Manual Therapy Reactions must be open for patients too like it is in cases of Adverse Drug Reactions and like in the ADR reporting systems the patients need to be encouraged to report to this system by their own (e.g. like in VAERS / vaccination). 1) So the first step ist to organise the national reporting of data. 2) The nect step then is the scientific epidemiological exploration of the reported cases: https://data.europa.eu/euodp/de/data/dataset/suspected-adverse-drug-reaction-reports https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/21685607/
  • Comment by Edzard on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Thursday 20 June 2019: 12:06 not quite! I decide what gets published on this blog, if you don't mind.
  • Comment by Edzard on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Thursday 20 June 2019: 12:06 "you refer to me as an imbecile" I DID NOT! learn to read
  • Comment by DC on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Thursday 20 June 2019: 12:06 That’s too funny. You want to twist the paper to discuss AE reporting in chiropractic. I point out a few of the limitations of such a system. But now you refer to me as an imbecile. Apparently, you don’t even know what you want to discuss.
  • Comment by DC on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Thursday 20 June 2019: 12:06 EE...with your kind permission, I will discuss here what I want to discuss. Ditto.
  • Comment by Edzard on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Thursday 20 June 2019: 12:06 are you trying to convince me that you are an imbecile?
  • Comment by DC on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Thursday 20 June 2019: 11:06 EE...with your permission, I will harp on about this until patients’ safety is taken care of adequately!!! “FDA does not require that a causal relationship between a product and event be proven, and reports do not always contain enough detail to properly evaluate an event.” “Importantly, the FAERS data by themselves are not an indicator of the safety profile of the drug.” https://www.fda.gov/drugs/surveillance/fda-adverse-event-reporting-system-faers
  • Comment by Lenny on Individualised (traditional) herbalism: best avoided, in my view Thursday 20 June 2019: 10:06 @RG As so often, the fact that people die in aircraft accidents does not validate a belief in magic carpets.
  • Comment by Chris Mole on Mistletoe, a cancer therapy? You must be joking! Thursday 20 June 2019: 09:06 Did your mum not do any conventional treatment for her cancer?
  • Comment by RG on Individualised (traditional) herbalism: best avoided, in my view Thursday 20 June 2019: 09:06 My attempts at vilifying medicine are NOT inept, they are true, and you know it. On the contrary, pharma medicine is worthy of being vilified. Neither Physicians nor pharmaceuticals inform patients correctly that the meds they prescribe long term are slowly killing them. "The fools who collected scare stories about medicines are not revealing any secrets and many of the claims are pure nonsense." Bjorn, I already informed you that it was my physician that alerted me to the dangers of pills, so why is it nonsense ? Meds that are presumed by millions to be safe, yet Motrin is killing people by the thousands. What do you think is happening with prescription meds that are more toxic and more dangerous than Motrin ? People are dying daily in the name of allopathic medicine, and the pills are only on of the causes.
  • Comment by Björn Geir on Individualised (traditional) herbalism: best avoided, in my view Thursday 20 June 2019: 08:06 Your attempts at smartly vilifying medicine are painfully inept, RG. Of course medicines have side effects, everyone knows that. They have side effects because they work and doctors know that and take it into account. Homeopathic remedies for example, have no side effects because they have no effects. The fools who collected scare stories about medicines are not revealing any secrets and many of the claims are pure nonsense. And you should look up the meaning of the word ‘anecdote’, you are evidently not understanding that either.
  • Comment by Edzard on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Thursday 20 June 2019: 06:06 with your kind permission, I will discuss here what I want to discuss.
  • Comment by Edzard on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Thursday 20 June 2019: 06:06 as I wrote in the post, the paper is a boring test of a bizarre hypothesis, in my mind. the question of AEs, however, is acute and needs a solution. [if you are hard of hearing, I could use capital letters]
  • Comment by Edzard on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Thursday 20 June 2019: 06:06 with your permission, I will harp on about this until patients' safety is taken care of adequately!!!
  • Comment by Edzard on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Thursday 20 June 2019: 06:06 so you say...
  • Comment by Critical_Chiro on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Thursday 20 June 2019: 06:06 @EE You are well aware that there are NO AE reporting systems for Chiro's AND osteo's and PHYSIO's, GP's etc except the one in the UK but that is run by a chiro association who advocate for chiro's and therefore . Yet you still harp on about it as if its purely a failing of the chiropractic profession. As you know (I have pointed this out to you before) years ago we tried to have a standardized AE reporting system brought in here for ALL professions (chiro, physio, ostoe, GP etc) with the information gathered in emergency departments free from medical bias and assumptions. The report would then sent to the relevant registration board for investigation. It had the FULL support of the CHIROPRACTORS. It was killed off by doctors. A leading medical pain specialist who also supported it told us it went no further due to "sniveling" from doctors.
  • Comment by VOR on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Wednesday 19 June 2019: 23:06 What is their next report, 'Bears really do poop in the woods' or 'We can confirm the Pope is a Catholic'?
  • Comment by Osteopathie Praxis im Klinikum Karlsruhe on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Wednesday 19 June 2019: 22:06 As long as they do not tell, what exactly they did under which circumstances the term "manual therapy" is as precise as "surgery".... so "is there evidence" for "surgery" is a worthless category like it is for "manual therapy" in general I guess... It is necessary to install national reporting systems for AR or side effects of manual therapy like it is compulsatory in cases of AR of drugs, especially for AR of high velocity low amplitude spinal manipulations and visceral manipulations.
  • Comment by jm on Individualised (traditional) herbalism: best avoided, in my view Wednesday 19 June 2019: 19:06 Frank, Yikes. You’re right, I completely missed your point. I really expected better of you. “It didn’t matter what massage technique was used: they all had at least small positive effects…” I guess if you’re after small positive effects, this study is quite useful :). Way back in grade school sciene classes, we were taught to eliminate or control as many variables as possible when doing any kind of experiment. I see that you don’t subscribe to that theory. “The wrong kind of bodywork for the particular fibro patient can trigger a flare up” the systematic review suggests otherwise.” The suggestion of the systematic review doesn’t match reality. Don’t take my word for it. Ask around. There’s no shortage of fibro folks. “The detail may be of great interest to those of you who take the specific effects and benefits of massage seriously” Yes, I have a weird interest in not causing folks to be bedridden with pain for a couple of weeks. Go figure - everybody needs a hobby. And speaking of hobbies, keep in mind that Richard’s hobby is studying how people can be fooled. “Richard Rawlins has commented a few times that we all enjoy benefit from a ‘good massage’.” Richard also thinks that acupressure involves needles, because ‘acu’ is part of the term (https://edzardernst.com/2018/05/exeter-university-offers-bogus-treatments-but-is-not-in-a-position-to-actively-condone-the-effectiveness-of-such-treatments/#comment-102343). “Why don’t you and your colleagues put together a convincing application for funding to undertake a proper study instead of relying on anecdote?” And what would the benefit of that be? How would that be more useful than thousands of conversations about treatment details over the past 20 years? Over that time period, the understanding of fibro has changed quite a bit, meds are different, treatment strategies have evolved…seriously, how would a proper study be more than just a nostalgic snapshot on an ever changing timeline? Again, this is an example of how anecdotes yield more helpful results for finding effective therapeutic solutions.
  • Comment by DC on More chiropractic delusions about infantile colic Wednesday 19 June 2019: 19:06 McGill has about 8 papers he has co-authored on spinal manipulation. I don't know his views on the various approaches.
  • Comment by DC on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Wednesday 19 June 2019: 18:06 EE...and how would you call a profession that... This has nothing to do with the paper on students adjusting patients in a Swedish naprapath college. If you don't want to discuss the paper that you posted, fine.
  • Comment by Edzard on The majority of patients having manual therapy for back or neck pain report adverse events Wednesday 19 June 2019: 18:06 and how would you call a profession that 1) has strong suspicion of AEs 2) knows about it for donkey's years 3) cannot manage to establish this essential requirement? RESPONSIBLE? CARING FOR PATIENTS? PROGRESSIVE? INTERESTED IN EVIDENCE?
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