MD, PhD, MAE, FMedSci, FRSB, FRCP, FRCPEd.

The 30 most recent comments from all posts are listed below. Click on the post title to go to the comment on the post’s page.

  • Comment by Edzard on Catastrophic injuries after chiropractic treatment Tuesday 05 July 2022: 06:07 Yes, I will try again for those who are slow on the uptake: THE VALUE OF ANY TREATMENT IS DETERMINED BY ITS RISK/BENEFIT BALANCE. As neck adjustments have no or little proven benefit, their risk/benefit balance is NEGATIVE! Got it this time?
  • Comment by Dthomp4633@aol.com on Catastrophic injuries after chiropractic treatment Monday 04 July 2022: 23:07 You do know that would also include many medical procedures, right? You should try again.
  • Comment by DC on Catastrophic injuries after chiropractic treatment Monday 04 July 2022: 22:07 RR There is no evidence that cervical manipulation has any benefits(*). No evidence? combining different forms of MT with exercise is better than MT or exercise alone https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28826164/ There was moderate level evidence to support the immediate effectiveness of cervical spine manipulation in treating people with cervical radiculopathy. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25681406/ Our review adds new evidence to the Neck Pain Task Force and suggests that mobilization, manipulation, and clinical massage are effective interventions for the management of neck pain. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26707074/ Upper cervical spine thrust manipulation or mobilisation techniques are more effective than control (low to high evidence), while thoracic manipulations are not. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26059857/
  • Comment by John on Catastrophic injuries after chiropractic treatment Monday 04 July 2022: 21:07 I don’t know what your intention was in quoting this but if it means that 66% of whoever they were asking understood that chiropractors are not comparable to doctors, that can only be good.
  • Comment by Edzard on Catastrophic injuries after chiropractic treatment Monday 04 July 2022: 21:07 I can tell you what unsafe means: if you fight for your life after an adjustment
  • Comment by Dr. Guy Almog, DC on Catastrophic injuries after chiropractic treatment Monday 04 July 2022: 21:07 Please define “safe” and acceptable levels of “transient reactions” and “complications”.
  • Comment by DC on Catastrophic injuries after chiropractic treatment Monday 04 July 2022: 20:07 Jim: Most patients believe these chiropractors are medical doctors Any supporting evidence? Let me start you out… “Thirty-four percent (34%)…believed that chiropractors are as well trained as GPs….” January 2007Chiropractic Journal of Australia 37:135-140
  • Comment by jim on Catastrophic injuries after chiropractic treatment Monday 04 July 2022: 18:07 Seems neck manipulation is par for course, regardless if you tell them no. Most patients believe these chiropractors are medical doctors and know what is best for you. 25 years ago, prior to internet, they were full blown medical doctors in most peoples eyes, like I thought. You tell them no neck, you feel you are questioning their practice and cater to them. Many feel obligated for neck routine because of this, even today.
  • Comment by RPGNo1 on A well-known opponent of vaccination has died of COVID after self-treatment with MMS Monday 04 July 2022: 15:07 @striketheroot I was able to test myself free of isolation with a rapid antigen test today. Since I am vaccinated and boostered, I only had a mild cold and no other symptoms of Covid-19. Conclusion: As predicted, the “poison” against Corona helps, even if you Corona deniers and vaccination opponents stamp your foot, cover your ears and sing Mimimi.
  • Comment by DC on Catastrophic injuries after chiropractic treatment Monday 04 July 2022: 12:07 I read it the first time. Such news reports often/always lack the necessary information to help determine the probability of causation. Even published case reports often fail in this regard. BTW. The case they referenced they used the 1 in 20,000. Not only is this an incomplete reference to the original author (he stated it could be up to 1 in 1 million) it isn’t backed up by any data that I can find. It was his opinion.
  • Comment by Richard Rasker on Catastrophic injuries after chiropractic treatment Monday 04 July 2022: 12:07 @DC It is really very simple: – There is no evidence that cervical manipulation has any benefits(*). – There are strong indications that cervical manipulation comes with a small but non-negligible risk of very serious injuries. It should be clear to anyone with at least two functioning brain cells that at the very least, chiropractors should immediately stop messing with people’s necks. And it would even be better if you people would find a proper job instead of continuing this half-baked century-old quackery, because you stubbornly refuse to learn from the things you do wrong. *: There isn’t even good evidence that chiropractic treatment in general has clinical benefits over regular physiotherapy.
  • Comment by Edzard on Catastrophic injuries after chiropractic treatment Monday 04 July 2022: 11:07 chiropractors across the globe continue to be able to say that such reports are unreliable. The medical literature, they are keen to point out, holds only very few case studies of serious risks of chiropractic spinal manipulation. Hence they falsely claim on every possible occasion that their adjustments are safe. The end effect is that many consumers continue to wrongly assume that chiropractic manipulations might be worth a try.
  • Comment by DC on Catastrophic injuries after chiropractic treatment Monday 04 July 2022: 11:07 EE It is clear that these news reports lack important medical details. That is correct. If one is to assume causation there were intrinsic factors present in order for a properly performed cSMT (assumed) to damage all four arteries. If true, this appears to be more likely a case of an improper history and exam (which the article provided none of those details). “An underlying disease or triggering event was identified in 71%, most commonly trauma (35%, cervical manipulative therapy in 13%), infection (18%), fibromuscular dysplasia (16%), and hereditary connective tissue disorder (8%).” https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00415-019-09269-1
  • Comment by Richard Rasker on Catastrophic injuries after chiropractic treatment Monday 04 July 2022: 11:07 I suggest that anyone reading this forward this to their friends and family members who are under treatment of chiropractors or plan to consult one. I can report at least one small success: an acquaintance of mine who had been consulting a chiropractor for several months(*) for upper back pain immediately ended all treatments when her chiro intended to ‘adjust’ her neck, and insisted that this intervention was necessary, even when she indicated that she did not feel comfortable about it – this was after I brought a previous article to her attention. (And oh, her back is much better now, without any special interventions.) *: The fact that her complaints did not substantially improve even after six or seven treatments also helped her to decide that chiropractic treatment was useless.
  • Comment by Lenny on A well-known opponent of vaccination has died of COVID after self-treatment with MMS Monday 04 July 2022: 09:07 Comparing the vaccinated with the unvaccinated from April 2021 to April 2022 during the Delta and Omicron surges Vaccinated individuals had a 1.9 X reduced risk of contracting COVID and a 6 X reduction in risk of death from COVID compared to the unvaccinated. But of course it’s a great experiment which doesn’t work and is part of a depopulation agenda yadda yadda. The thing is, when these forecast deaths fail to materialise (As per for example the predictions of the QAnon loons) will they admit that they were wrong? No. They won’t. These are people impervious to logic or evidence. Antivax is a religious faith.
  • Comment by DavidB on A well-known opponent of vaccination has died of COVID after self-treatment with MMS Monday 04 July 2022: 08:07 How arrant, how inaccurate, can nonsense get?
  • Comment by Lenny on A well-known opponent of vaccination has died of COVID after self-treatment with MMS Monday 04 July 2022: 07:07 And still the tinfoil-hatted antivax loons continue to hoot their idiocy. Run along, child. You’ve nothing new to bring to the show.
  • Comment by Edzard on ‘Body Modification Provider’: a new healthcare profession to be avoided at all costs Monday 04 July 2022: 07:07 the practitioner has been sentenced to 10 years in prison; https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-07-04/body-modifier-brendan-russell-jailed-for-manslaughter-/101206092
  • Comment by prl on Steep decline in public confidence for alternative medicine in Norway Monday 04 July 2022: 04:07 From my limited experience of only ever observing one birth, my immediate thought on acupuncture during labour was simply “wouldn’t all those needles just get in the way, no matter where they were put?”
  • Comment by striketheroot on A well-known opponent of vaccination has died of COVID after self-treatment with MMS Sunday 03 July 2022: 23:07 The worm has certainly turned in 2.5 years. The inefficacy of the vax has even been opening admitted by the ” authorities” who were pushing this poison from the beginning…
  • Comment by DC on Steep decline in public confidence for alternative medicine in Norway Sunday 03 July 2022: 18:07 I wasn’t countering anything. Geesh. Assume much? BTW you never responded to my response for your request for the research on the cervical spinal manipulation benefits.
  • Comment by Björn Geir on Steep decline in public confidence for alternative medicine in Norway Sunday 03 July 2022: 16:07 As so often we will have to agree to disagree. You efforts to counter whatever on this blog are mostly less than convincing 🙄
  • Comment by DC on Steep decline in public confidence for alternative medicine in Norway Sunday 03 July 2022: 15:07 I would expect expenditures to reflect confidence/trust. Granted other factors are at play. Most studies I’ve seen on the topic stop around 2008. Seems this is Ernst Wheelhouse.
  • Comment by Björn Geir on Steep decline in public confidence for alternative medicine in Norway Sunday 03 July 2022: 14:07 Not similar. The incline you point out is in wide area market size measured in revenue over five years, mostly in areas with less developed public enlightenment. The trend observed in Norway (and the subject of this discussion) is measured trust/confidence in so called natural medicine over two decades. Very different causative factors probably at play. I also beg to doubt the validity of this projected growth forecast for the next several years, which seems more like guesswork than science. Of course we can expect a revenue growth in areas like China where government incentive is driving the industry. But I doubt the growth potential in the nordic countries and similar cultures withstrong opposition to SCAM is good, seeing that public trust in quackery has already been greatly decreased. The inference from these survey results is that sceptical resistance seems to work and we should continue and expand our efforts against the marketing and practice of SCAM.
  • Comment by DC on Steep decline in public confidence for alternative medicine in Norway Sunday 03 July 2022: 11:07 “ I wonder if you think the marketing-research guesswork you are refering to has any relevance to the survey results about popular trust in natural medicine presented in the Norwegian article?” Your original question: “It would be very interesting to know if a similar trend has been observed elsewhere.” If you look at the graph in the article, published in 2021, it goes back to 2016 showing an incline in usage based upon regions. Thus I think it addresses your question. Norway may be an anomaly. Time will tell.
  • Comment by Electricus on Lakhovsky’s oscillator, the ‘cure all’ that the world forgot Sunday 03 July 2022: 09:07 “Just a few words, but no clarity as to what was meant, particularly when Edzard was referring to Lakhovsky transmitting from 1 Hz to 300 GHz (the latter clearly not referring to the fundamental frequency being transmitted but simply harmonics – although he would have had no way to measure them), hence my question to RG.” No sound waves, EM waves. The acoustic waves are just used for analogies. No transmission of any waves is considered without the far field. Therefor the term “antenna” is not accurate and just a misleading commodity. There is no fundamental frequency in the mwo (LC – rings) as they produce a continuous spectrum in the approx. form of a white noise. The only device creating harmonics on top of its fundamental is the Tesla coil itself. There are two diifferent planes of energy that need to be considered here. The source excites all elements by impulses and distributes its energy over these two aspects inequally by nature. The 1. being a high energy and high amplitude smallband signal, the 2. being the low energy and amplitude broadband noise. I write this, being well aware that even accurate information adds only more to the standing confusion for the majority of people, because there are way too much misunderstanding and wrong conclusions and assumptions around the physics here.
  • Comment by Edzard on Another death by homeopathy Sunday 03 July 2022: 07:07 the patient died due to the long-term effects of arsenic poisoning; I have no idea what your strange ramblings refer to.
  • Comment by Björn Geir on Steep decline in public confidence for alternative medicine in Norway Sunday 03 July 2022: 01:07 Good catch Richard. I have worked for long periods in Norway and am quite used to reading and even speaking Norwegian. This article is written in a less familiar dialect. I used Google-translate on some parts of the text to expediate the writing as I find correcting the Google-errors is faster than writing up the whole text. I stupidly missed this one 🙄 Yes Ms.Moldestad is indeed an archetypical homeopath with all the standard delusional ideas.
  • Comment by Björn Geir on Steep decline in public confidence for alternative medicine in Norway Sunday 03 July 2022: 01:07 Here is a rather amusing story about acupuncture I was told recently by a friend. He was accompanying his wife in labour when the midwife offered her acupuncture, which she promised would help a lot. As a good husband he let his wife decide, which she did. After the baby was born, the midwife asked his wife if the acupuncture didn’t have a good effect, to which the mother replied negatively adding that she had not felt any effect other than the discomfort from the needles. Shortly after, my friend overheard the midwife report to her colleague that the woman who just gave birth had received acupuncture with good effect. In my mind, this little story demonstrates brilliantly how acupuncture and other useless theatricals “work”, like magic.
  • Comment by Björn Geir on Steep decline in public confidence for alternative medicine in Norway Sunday 03 July 2022: 00:07 @DC I wonder if you think the marketing-research guesswork you are refering to has any relevance to the survey results about popular trust in natural medicine presented in the Norwegian article? As a matter of fact the item about acupuncture in Norway back in 2008 may be close to the truth but tells only a small and misleading part of the story. Acupuncture became a very popular complementary practice among midwives reaching a peak somewhere in the beginning of the century and is still being used by midwives albeit less and less. I am actually surprised the number of hospitals where they offered acupuncture during labour and delivery was only 40%. I’d have thought it was being practised in a good majority of maternity clinics back then. Acupuncture is steadily becoming less popular in this part of the world and I suspect public information and awareness has much to do with it. I actually spoke to the head midwife of a private clinic recently, who told me to my surprise they had abandoned acupuncture altogether, a service they previously advertised proudly. I think the time is ripe to suggest that this unnecessary and injurious disturbance of maternity and labour be abandoned altogether.
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