MD, PhD, FMedSci, FRSB, FRCP, FRCPEd.

The ‘College of Medicine and Integrated Health’ (CMIH) has been the subject of several previous blog posts (see for instance here, here and here). Recently, they have come up with something new that, in my view, deserves a further comment.

The new ‘SELF CARE TOOL KIT’ began, according to the CMIH, in 2009 with a national multi-centre project commissioned by the UK Department of Health, to consider the best way to integrate self care into family practice. The project involved two large family health centres and two university departments. One output was the Self Care Library (SCL).

The Self Care Library (SCL) is an online patient resource providing free evidence-based information about self-care.  The funding for the SCL did, however, not survive, and the facility was assigned to the CMIH. Thanks to funding from ‘Pukka Herbs Vitamins, Herbal Remedies & Health Supplements‘, the CMIH was able to transfer the content and to begin updating entries. Simon Mills, the coordinator of the original project who is now employed by Pukka, has led this transformation and helped the College set up the new parent portal, Our Health Directory.

The Self Care Toolkit is thus the new SCL. All concerned with this project are experienced in clinical practice and can separate the theory from real life needs. We all have academic lives as well so can be hard-nosed with the evidence base as well.

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The above text is essentially based on the information provided by the CMIH. A few critical remarks and clarifications might therefore be in order:

  • What does ‘separate the theory from real life needs’ mean? Does it mean that the scientific evidence can be interpreted liberally (see below)?
  • Is it a good idea to have a commercial sponsor for such a project?
  • Is it wise that the main person in charge is on the payroll of a manufacturer of dietary supplements?
  • Is there any oversight to minimise undue bias and prevent the public from being misled?
  • Is it really true that all people involved have academic lives? Simon Mills (who once was a member of my team) has no longer an academic appointment, as far as I know.

But, you are right, these are perhaps mere trivialities. Let’s see what the ‘Self Care Tool Kit’ actually delivers. I have chosen the entry on DEPRESSION to check its validity. Here it is:

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It isn’t likely that taking extra vitamins will make much difference to low mood or depression. It is true that many people don’t get quite enough B, C and D vitamins in their food. And it’s also true that the brain and nervous system need these vitamins. Because they don’t get stored in the body, our daily diet has to supply them. Research has shown that people with low blood levels of the B vitamin folic acid are more likely to be depressed and less likely to do well on anti-depressant medicines. So, if you are eating a very poor diet, taking extra vitamins just might help. It’s also worth remembering that alcohol, refined sugars, nicotine and caffeine all take these vitamins out of the body. Yet most people who feel depressed probably won’t benefit from taking vitamins alone. To ensure that you get a good balance of these vitamins, try to eat more whole-foods, fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds.

Some people say that taking high doses of vitamin C (1-2 g and more a day) helps lift their mood. There is a little research to support this and none showing that high doses of vitamin C actually help clinical depression. Vitamin C levels fall after surgery or inflammatory disease. The body needs more vitamin C when coping with stress, pregnancy and breast feeding. Aspirin, tetracycline and contraceptive pills take vitamin C out of the body. Smokers also need extra vitamin C because nicotine removes it. Fresh fruit and vegetables are the best sources of vitamin C.

Doctors are increasingly concerned about low vitamin D, especially in the Asian community. A lack of vitamin D can lead to depression. Oily fish and dairy products are good sources of vitamin D, and sunlight helps the body make vitamin D. Do you get enough sunshine and eat a good diet? It is estimated that worldwide over 1 billion people get too little vitamin D.

Evidence
Taking supplements of vitamins B and D might help some people, whose diet is poor, but more research is needed.

Safety
Very high doses of vitamins and minerals can upset the body and cause side-effects. Get medical advice if you intend to take large doses. To ensure that you get a good balance of these vitamins, try to eat more whole-foods, fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds.

Cost
If your diet is poor and you don’t get into the sun, ask your doctor about a vitamin D blood test. If it’s normal, there’s no point in taking vitamin D. If it’s low, your GP will prescribe it for you or you can buy a vitamin D supplement.

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In my view, this text begs several questions:

1) Am I right in thinking that phraseology such as the one below will encourage patients suffering from depression to try the supplements mentioned?

  • people with low blood levels of the B vitamin folic acid are more likely to be depressed and less likely to do well on anti-depressant medicines..
  • Some people say that taking high doses of vitamin C (1-2 g and more a day) helps lift their mood…
  • There is a little research to support this and none showing that high doses of vitamin C actually help clinical depression…
  • A lack of vitamin D can lead to depression.
  • Taking supplements of vitamins B and D might help some people…
  • … your GP will prescribe it for you or you can buy a vitamin D supplement.

2) How does that tally with the latest evidence? For instance:

3) The CMIH state: ‘This site gives you information NOT medical advice.’  But, in view of the actual text above, is this true?

4) Depression is a life-threatening condition. Is there a risk that patients trust the CMHI’s (non-) advice and commit suicide because of its ineffectiveness?

5) Do Pukka, the sponsor of all this, happen to supply most of the self care remedies promoted in the ‘Self Care Tool Kit’?

The answer to the last question, I am afraid, is YES!

4 Responses to A new ‘self care tool kit’ by the ‘College of Medicine and Integrated Health’

  • O doubt it includes a spanner for screwing the had back on.

  • From the “About us” section:

    “Thanks to a new partnership between the College and Pukka, human resources became available to transfer the content of the SCL to a new platform suitable for smartphone and tablet use, and to begin the work of updating entries with new research.”

    They write that as if to say, “Thankfully, Pukka rescued us and enabled us to make this very valuable resource is available to you all!”

    I can’t think of a situation that is more of a conflict of interest than this one.

    Oh, wait. I can. I go to the veterinarian and he says “Your bunny has heebie-jeebies and needs SPECIAL food. You’ll see it for sale on the way out.”

    After I see PCL is funded by a supplement manufacturer, nothing else matters because ALL the information is suspect in my eyes.

    My bunny is fine, by the way.

  • THe studies that you site in section 2 can be summed up: from a ridiculous premise you get meaningless results.

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