MD, PhD, FMedSci, FRSB, FRCP, FRCPEd.

The Royal London Homeopathic Hospital, recently re-named as the Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine (RLHIM), has been one of the most influential homeopathic hospitals in the world. It was founded in 1849 by Dr Frederick Foster Hervey Quin. In 1895, a new and larger hospital was opened on its present site in Great Ormond Street. Many famous homeopaths have worked there, including Robert Ellis Dudgeon, John Henry Clarke, James Compton Burnett, Edward Bach, Charles E Wheeler, James Kenyon, Margaret Tyler, Douglas Borland, Sir John Weir, Donald Foubister, Margery Blackie and Ralph Twentyman. In 1920, the hospital received Royal Patronage from the Duke of York, later King George VI, who also became its president in 1924, and in 1936, the Hospital was honoured by the Patronage of His Majesty the King gaining its ‘Royal’ prefix in 1947. Today, Queen Elizabeth II is the Hospital’s Patron.

On 18 June 1972, 16 of the hospital’s doctors and colleagues on board were killed in a plane crash. During the following years, several reductions in size and income took place. From 2002 to 2005, the hospital underwent a £20m redevelopment and, in 2010, its name was changed to Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine.

The hospital just published a new brochure for patients. It contains interesting information and therefore, I will quote directly from this document.

START OF QUOTES

The Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine (RLHIM) is part of University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and accepts all NHS referrals. GP referrals are by letter or via Choose and Book. Patients can also be referred by their NHS hospital consultant.

NHS Choices provides information and an opportunity to provide feedback about our service at www.nhs.uk
….

The General Medicine Service is led by three consultant physicians. The team also includes other doctors and nurses, a dietitian, a physiotherapist, an occupational therapist and a psychotherapist. The service sees patients with chronic and complex conditions. The team is trained in many areas of complementary medicine. These are used alongside orthodox treatment, allowing them to offer a fully integrated General Medicine service. The General Medicine Service offers a full range of diagnostic tests as well as a variety of treatments and advice on orthodox treatment.

From 3rd April 2018, The Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine (RLHIM) will no longer be providing NHS-funded homeopathic remedies for any patients as part of their routine care. This is in line with the funding policy of Camden Clinical Commissioning Groups, the local NHS body that plans and pays for healthcare services in this area.

Should you choose you will be able to purchase these medicines from the RLHIM pharmacy, while other homeopathic pharmacies may also be able to supply the medicines. You can speak to your clinician or the RLHIM pharmacy at your next visit about this…

Conditions commonly seen include:

  • Recurrent infections, such as colds, sore throats, cystitis, thrush, chest infections and bacterial infections
  • Some persistent symptoms where tests have not revealed a serious underlying disorder
  • Asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • Digestive disorders, for example acid reflux, Irritable Bowel Syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease
  • Endocrine (glandular) disorders such as under-active thyroid
  • Type II diabetes
  • Some types of heart disease, high blood pressure and palpitations (requiring no orthodox treatment)
  • Chronic headache such as migraine or tension-type headache
  • Side effects of prescribed medications

END OF QUOTES

Clearly, the big news here is that the RLHIM has been forced to stop providing NHS-funded homeopathics. This could be indicative of what might soon happen throughout NHS England.

But there are other items that I find remarkable: “The General Medicine Service offers a full range of diagnostic tests as well as a variety of treatments and advice on orthodox treatment.” Call me a nit-picker, but this is not INTEGRATED! Integrated medicine means employing both alternative as well as conventional therapies in parallel. The best of BOTH worlds and all that…

In the same vein is the statement that they treat “some types of heart disease, high blood pressure and palpitations (requiring no orthodox treatment)” I am sorry, but this again is not INTEGRATED MEDICINE! I ask myself, is it ethical to mislead patients, colleagues, NHS officials and everyone else pretending to deliver ‘integrated medicine’, while in fact all they seem to offer is ‘alternative medicine’?

The RLHIM has recently dropped the term HOMEOPATHY from its name. Soon it might have to also abandon the term INTEGRATED, because it does not seem to be able to provide a safe level of conventional medicine.

How shall we then call it?

Suggestions please!

17 Responses to Fascinating news from the ‘Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine’

  • It is not the “homeopathic” or “integrative” term they should drop, but rather, the word medicine. They should call it The Royal college of integrative …therapy, remedies, ritualistic healing, folk therapy, or mind body connection. But not Medicine.

  • I would recommend the “Skeptics with a K” podcast that goes into some of the detail behind this http://www.merseysideskeptics.org.uk/2018/01/skeptics-with-a-k-episode-215/ For those who are familiar with how NHS commissioning works, it provides an insight into its sometimes byzantine working.

    The relevant part starts at 42:15

  • How about ‘Royal London Hospital for Pseudomedicine (plus a few real therapies)’?

  • Orthodox medicine plus heterodox medicine = integrative medicine is the implication.

    If non-CAM medicine is orthodox then CAM medicine must be heterodox.

    The brochure does raise questions about the status of orthodox medicine in the hospital. Does the hospital first treat patients in the same way as any other hospital in the NHS would but then sprinkle some heterodox medicine into the mix? Or is it heterodox medicine first and then sprinkle some orthodox medicine on top, or is it simply advice about orthodox medicine?

    Royal Hospital for Murky Malarkey.

  • Royal London Water and Sugar Dispensary?

  • For the record, the leaflets the RLHIM have so far changed to state that they will no longer be providing homeopathy or herbal products are:

    Womens Service
    Childrens Service
    General Medicine Service
    Rheumatology service
    Podiatry and Chiropody
    Western Herbal Medicine Service

  • ‘Royal London Hospital’ – obviously.

    Yes, there will be confusion with one of the same name in Whiitechapel, but when RLHfIM first came up with its new title and started their marketing, I wrote to the Whitechapel RLH CEO and pointed this out – they were not bothered and not prepared to take the issue up with the Privy Council whose responsibility it is to regulate use of ‘Royal’ titles.

    I if HM does not mind the confusion, it would be impertinent for her subjects to do so.

  • Edzard

    “Clearly, the big news here is that the RLHIM has been forced to stop providing NHS-funded homeopathic. This could be indicative of what might soon happen throughout NHS England.”

    It is no good to share part of the information. The real update is that NHS is moving into bankruptcy. And the reason:

    “Seven leaders including Niall Dickson, chief executive of the NHS Confederation, warned justice secretary David Gauke that the rising cost of clinical negligence claims was having a significant impact on the health service.
    The health and social care secretary, Jeremy Hunt, was also copied into the letter, which was sent on Monday.
    The group, which includes the chairs of the British Medical Association and the Academy of Medical Royal colleges, said the NHS spent £1.7bn on negligence claims last year and the annual cost has doubled since 2010/11.
    They added that the estimated total liabilities, which is the cost if all current claims are successful, stands at £65bn, up from £29bn in 2014-15.”

    “The group said: “We fully accept there must be reasonable compensation for patients harmed through clinical negligence but this needs to be balanced against society’s ability to pay.”

    Very impressive:

    “Payouts given to NHS patients who have been victims of negligence should be reduced because they are unsustainable”, health service leaders have told the justice secretary.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/feb/02/nhs-compensation-payouts-unsustainable-say-health-leaders

    Negligence will continue. That is NOT unsustainable.

    Imagine the outcome when high value scientific medical interventions are stopped. The fun begins.

    • too stupid a comment to merit a response

      • Edzard

        I am aware of your new found love for the Indians(1 Indian killed by Epsom salt finds mention in your post) and the scorn you have started showing for the British (billions of scarce resources being wasted and no helpful advise from you).

        What has changed?

    • You can write yourself, fellow Iqbal, spare yourself the time of copy-pasting.. Nobody checks the completely irrelevant pieces you paste anyway. You could try talking yourself a bit, for a change. Write all you wish as you wish it were. No conventional medicine, an entire world of unprotected patients and an entire market of toy medicine juat for you. Type all your dreams-come-true!

  • The RLHIM has finally announced this on their web pages rather than hidden in their leaflets:

    RLHIM Pharmacy

    Important information

    From 3rd April 2018, The Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine (RLHIM) will no longer be providing NHS-funded homeopathic remedies, Iscador and herbal medicines for any patients as part of their routine care. This is in line with the funding policy of Camden Clinical Commissioning Groups, the local NHS body that plans and pays for healthcare services in this area.

    Should you choose you will be able to purchase these medicines from the RLHIM pharmacy, while other homeopathic pharmacies may also be able to supply the medicines. You can speak to your clinician or the RLHIM pharmacy at your next visit about this.

  • The RLHIM have also just removed the following from list of services:

    Complementary cancer care clinic
    Complementary cancer care service – children adolescents and young adults
    Skin Clinic
    Weight Loss Clinic

  • Given this news and given that RLHIM haven’t even had a homeopathy service for several years, this announcement last week is rather surprising:

    Ayush ministry signed MoU with Royal London Homoeopathic Hospital

    Central Council for Research in Homoeopathy, an autonomous body under the Ministry of AYUSH has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine, United Kingdom on Cooperation in the field of Research and Education in Homoeopathic Medicine.

    The MoU aims at strengthening & developing co-operation in the field of Research & Education in Homoeopathic Medicine at International level. This encompasses joint research projects; exchange of information; organisation of seminars/workshops etc.

    This information was given by the Minister of State (Independent Charge) for AYUSH, Shri Shripad Yesso Naik in written reply to a question in Lok Sabha.

    The Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine (RLHIM) is the largest public-sector provider of integrated medicine in Europe. Formerly known as the Royal London Homeopathic Hospital, the RLHIM offers an innovative, patient-centred service integrating the best of conventional and complementary treatments for a wide range of conditions. All clinics are led by consultants, doctors and other registered healthcare professionals who have received additional training in complementary medicine.

    The RLHIM operates on an outpatient clinic basis.

    Working closely with the other hospitals at UCLH, it has access to modern conventional techniques as well as inpatient services when required. Clinical services include women’s health, complementary cancer care, allergy service, skin clinics, acupuncture, rheumatology service, children’s service, weight loss management, organic insomnia, musculoskeletal medicine and stress management.

  • Out with orthodox, in with conventional.

    Apparently the hospital intends to continue “research/teaching” unconventional medicine. Royal London Hospital for Integrating Conventional and Unconventional Medicine.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Recent Comments

Note that comments can be edited for up to five minutes after they are first submitted.


Click here for a comprehensive list of recent comments.

Categories