MD, PhD, MAE, FMedSci, FRSB, FRCP, FRCPEd.

Conspiracy theories have become a frequent theme on this blog, e.g.:

 

In fact, I have previously postulated that so-called alternative medicine (SCAM) can be understood as a conspiracy theory.

A new paper asked a relevant question: who believes in conspiracy theories? Conspiracy theories are ubiquitous and can have negative consequences. Thus, there is an increasing need for evidence-based recommendations with respect to interventions and prevention measures. Present Bayesian three-level meta-analysis includes a synthesis of the extant literature with respect to 12 personality correlates and their relationship with conspiracy beliefs. On average, people who believe in pseudoscience, suffer from paranoia or schizotypy, are narcissistic or religious/spiritual and have relatively low cognitive ability, are more likely to believe in conspiracy theories. Heterogeneity was partially explained by the examined moderators and no strong evidence for publication bias was found. Implications for developing tailored interventions are discussed in the article.

Conspiracy is a “secret plot by two or more powerful actors … Conspiracies typically attempt to usurp political or economic power, violate rights, infringe upon established agreements, withhold vital secrets, or alter bedrock institutions”. Conspiracy theories are used to describe and explain purported conspiracies.

People who believe in conspiracy theories are, according to this meta-analysis, more likely than other people to hold pseudoscientific beliefs, exhibit paranoid ideation, suffer from schizotypy, be narcissistic, be religious/spiritual and have lower cognitive ability.

Reading the comments sections of my blog, I agree with this conclusion.

5 Responses to Who believes in conspiracy theories? A meta-analysis

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