MD, PhD, FMedSci, FRSB, FRCP, FRCPEd.

Turmeric is certainly a plant with fascinating properties; we have therefore discussed it before. Reseach into turmeric continues to be active, and I will continue to report about new studies.

This study was aimed at estimating the effect of turmeric supplementation on quality of life (QoL) and haematological parameters in breast cancer patients who were on Paclitaxel chemotherapy. In this case series with 60 participants, QoL was assessed using a standard questionnaire and haematological parameters were recorded from the patients’ hospital records.

Turmeric supplementation for 21 days resulted in clinically relevant and statistically significant improvement in global health status, symptom scores (fatigue, nausea, vomiting, pain, appetite loss, insomnia), and haematological parameters.

The authors concluded that turmeric supplementation improved QoL, brought about symptom palliation and increased hematological parameters in breast cancer patients.

Really?

The way the conclusions are phrased, they clearly imply that turmeric caused the observed outcomes. How certain can we be that this is true?

On a scale of 0 -10, I would say 0.

Why?

Because there are important other determinants of the outcomes:

  • placebo,
  • concommittant treatments,
  • natural history,
  • etc., etc.

Why does this matter?

  • Because such unwarranted conclusions mislead patients, healthcare professionals and carers.
  • Because such bad science gives a bad name to clinical research.
  • Because this type of nonsense might deter meaningful research into a promising subject.
  • Because no ‘scientific’ journal should be permitted to publish such nonsense.
  • Because it is unethical of ‘scientists’ to make false claims.

But maybe the Indian authors are just a few well-meaning and naive practitioners who merely were doing their unexperienced best? Sadly not! The authors of this paper give the following affiliations:

  • Clinical Pharmacology, Pfizer Healthcare Private Limited, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
  • Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Sri Ramachandra Institute of Higher Education and Research, Porur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
  • Process Development, HCL Technologies, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
  • Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Sri Ramachandra Institute of Higher Education and Research, Porur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

Yes, they really should know better!

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