MD, PhD, FMedSci, FRSB, FRCP, FRCPEd.

Intravenous (IV) vitamin C seems to be recommended more and more, particularly by practitioners of so-called alternative medicine (SCAM). At least this is what this survey suggests:

We surveyed attendees at annual CAM Conferences in 2006 and 2008, and determined sales of intravenous vitamin C by major U.S. manufacturers/distributors. We also queried practitioners for side effects, compiled published cases, and analyzed FDA’s Adverse Events Database. Of 199 survey respondents (out of 550), 172 practitioners administered IV vitamin C to 11,233 patients in 2006 and 8876 patients in 2008. Average dose was 28 grams every 4 days, with 22 total treatments per patient. Estimated yearly doses used (as 25g/50ml vials) were 318,539 in 2006 and 354,647 in 2008. Manufacturers’ yearly sales were 750,000 and 855,000 vials, respectively. Common reasons for treatment included infection, cancer, and fatigue.

Yet, the potential harm associated with the use of IV vitamin C has not been systematically assessed. An international team of researchers aimed to fill this gap by reviewing the available evidence on harm related to such treatment. They included studies in adult populations that reported harm related to IV high-dose vitamin C which they defined as greater than or equal to 6 g/d, greater than or equal to 75 mg/kg/d, or greater than or equal to 3 g/m/d.

They identified 8,149 reports, of which 650 full text were assessed for eligibility, leaving 74 eligible studies. In these studies, 2,801 participants received high-dose vitamin C at a median (interquartile range) dose of 22.5 g/d (8.25-63.75 g/d), 455 mg/kg/d (260-925 mg/kg/d), or 70 g/m/d (50-90 g/m/d); and 932 or more adverse events were reported. Among nine double-blind randomized controlled trials (2,310 patients), adverse events were reported in three studies with an event rate per patient for high-dose vitamin C identical to placebo group in one study (0.1 [1/10] vs 0.1 [1/10]), numerically lower in one study (0.80 [672/839] vs 0.82 [709/869]), and numerically higher in one study (0.33 [24/73] vs 0.23 [17/74]). Six double-blind randomized controlled trials reported no adverse event in either group. Five cases of oxalate nephropathy, five cases of hypernatremia, three cases of hemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency patients, two cases of glucometer error, and one case of kidney stones were also reported overall.

The authors concluded that there is no consistent evidence that IV high-dose vitamin C therapy is more harmful than placebo in double-blind randomized controlled trials. However, reports of oxalate nephropathy, hypernatremia, glucometer error, and hemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency patients warrant specific monitoring.

So, is IV vitamin C safe or not?

I would interpret these findings as follows:

  • Clinical trials are often very poor yard-sticks for estimating safety; they are too small and often neglect to mention adverse effects.
  • When it come to evaluating the safety of therapeutic interventions, we must therefore often rely on case-reports, case series and other uncontrolled data.
  • Such data show that IV vitamin C has been associated with adverse effects, some of which are serious.
  • The incidence of such event remains unclear.

4 Responses to Intravenous high-dose vitamin C therapy: what are the dangers?

  • There are pharmacokinetic reasons for expecting harms and no benefits from high-dose vitamin C (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11135611/). First, its absorption from the gut is saturable at low doses, so most of it is not absorbed after oral administration, leading to high concentrations in the gut. Even if it is given intravenously, its tissue uptake from the blood is also saturable, and therefore little of the dose enters the tissues. And thirdly, it is rapidly excreted by the kidneys and its reabsorption from the renal tubules is saturable, leading to high concentrations in the urine and a risk of renal damage.

  • Serious, but most conditions easily reversible with simple hydration, it seems. And it seems like the doctors doing the therapy werent paying attention.

    • “…it seems…”
      And your medical/biological qualifications Roger, that make you competent to form an opinion are…?

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