MD, PhD, FMedSci, FRSB, FRCP, FRCPEd.

It is not often that a top journal reports a trial of a (mostly) herbal remedy. For this reason alone, this Italian study (published in the Journal of the American Heart Association) is remarkable.

Sixty‐nine uncontrolled hypertension patients, aged 40 to 68 years, on antihypertensive medication were enrolled in 2 double‐blind studies. In the first study, 45 were randomized to placebo or a new nutraceutical combination named AkP05. Blood pressure (BP), endothelial function, and circulating nitric oxide were assessed before and at the end of 4 weeks of treatment. In the second study, 24 patients were randomized to diuretic or AkP05 for 4 weeks and underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to evaluate the effects of AkP05 on functional capacity of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and muscular systems. Furthermore, vascular and molecular studies were undertaken on mice to characterize the action of the single compounds contained in the AkP05 nutraceutical combination.

AkP05 supplementation reduced BP, improved endothelial function, and increased nitric oxide release; cardiopulmonary exercise test revealed that AkP05 increased maximum O2 uptake, stress tolerance, and maximal power output. In mice, AkP05 reduced BP and improved endothelial function, evoking increased nitric oxide release through the PKCα/Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathway and reducing reactive oxygen species production via NADPH‐oxidase inhibition. These effects were mediated by synergism of the single compounds of AkP05.

The authors concluded that this is the first study reporting positive effects of a nutraceutical combination on the vasculature and exercise tolerance in treated hypertensive patients. Our findings suggest that AkP05 may be used as an adjunct for the improvement of cardiovascular protection and to better control BP in uncontrolled hypertension.

These are good studies, it seems. However, I am puzzled by the authors’ conclusions:

  1. I very much doubt that this is the first such study.
  2. The studies did not test AkP05 ‘as an adjunct’, so their findings cannot suggest that it should be used as such.

And now you are, of course, all dying to learn what this new wonder nutraceutical contains. It is a mixture of Bacopa monnieri, extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves, extract of green tea leaves, and phosphatidylserine and is manufactured by Damor Farmaceutici, Italy.

4 Responses to New Nutraceutical Reduces Blood Pressure

  • The patients were also on anti-hypertensive medication, although with poorly controlled blood pressure. Doesn’t that make it a trial as an adjunct?

  • While this is unusual, it isn’t really surprising to find an effective plant ingredient. I am old enough to remember reserpine.

    • There are many studies on senolytics going on, and up to now the combination of Quercetin, a nutraceutical, with Dasatinib, an anti-cancer drug, have being the most widely used with interesting results both in vitro and in vivo.
      There are also some work pointing the sinergy between both molecules and the diminution of their effects when applied alone.
      Last year, the first two human trials was conducted with positive results in inducing senescent cells to apoptosis.
      The point is, on those studies, Quercetin is not take from food, but purified and in huge amounts.
      With side effects as well.

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