MD, PhD, FMedSci, FRSB, FRCP, FRCPEd

Edzard Ernst – why he changed his mind! This is the title of a blog which I just found. It is such fun to read that I must show it to you in full [I added a few numbered footnotes in square brackets]:

BBC Radio 4 gave Professor Edzard Ernst a 15 minute slot to explain “Why I Changed My Mind’ on Wednesday 4th May 2016. It was repeated on 12th May 2016. He was interviewed by Dominic Lawson [1]. The programme demonstrates the lengths to which the BBC is prepared to go in order under undermine Alternative Medicine, and Homeopathy, in particular [2].

Lawson set the tone. Ernst, he stated, is hated by alternative health practitioners, the Prince of Wales tried to get him sacked, and he eventually lost his academic post because of the criticism he attracted for his work. Ernst was left to agree with this dreadfully unfair and unreasonable treatment [3]. So Ernst was then led to explain his ‘change of mind’ about homeopathy. As a friend and colleague of mine said,

“Ernst (says) that as a German, he was raised on Homeopathy, and later treated his patients with homeopathy. And it worked! But when he approached it ‘scientifically’, he concluded that it’s merely placebo.”

So let’s be clear. Ernst’s experience of homeopathy has  been that it does work [4], but that the science he has looked at does not demonstrate that it works. (Even this is wrong [5], but leave that for now!) So people do get better as the result of homeopathic treatment, but ‘science’, or at least Ernst’s science [6], does not understand why it should [7]. Ernst also said that he was convinced, at the time, that he was ‘helping patients’.

Lawson then asked his most difficult question (sic). If he knew that homeopathy worked, why did it work? Ernst’s response was that it was charlatanism and quackery, and was “quite puzzling’ really [8]. So as homeopathy worked, but science said it should not work [8], he went on to study this in his post at Exeter University.

Lawson, in the great tradition of BBC impartiality [2], (sic), continued to lead him on. “When did you decide that homeopathy was useless, delusional?”

Ernst said that when he ‘did the science’ it became clear that homeopathy is placebo.

Now, lets look at this word, placebo. The Oxford English Dictionary defines ‘the placebo effects’ as”

“A beneficial effect produced by a placebo drug or treatment, which cannot be attributed to the properties of the placebo itself, and must therefore be due to the patient’s belief in that treatment”

So by using the term ‘placebo’ Ernst is once again saying the homeopathy has a ‘beneficial effect’ on patients who are ill [9]. Lawson did ask Ernst whether there was anything wrong using placebo if this brought positive benefits to patients. Ernst said that people got better anyway! (Is it really is a simple as this?) [7]

Lawson, now thoroughly convinced of Ernst’s arguments, asked his whether he thought homeopaths were lying. With some apparent grace, Ernst said that lying was a strong term, by the were ‘deluded’, and ‘treated homeopathy as a religion’.

Lawson came back, asking why there were lots of qualified doctors who believe in homeopathy, and whether they should they be struck off, or stopped from practising? No, said Ernst, they were just not thinking critically, and needed to be educated out of their delusions.

Presumably, for both Lawson and Ernst, using a medical therapy that worked and brought benefit to patients [7], but which science could not explain, should be restricted, if not banned altogether.

Lawson’s final question clearly demonstrated his impartiality. “Can we justify homeopathy, or any other kind of quackery? (My emphasis). “No”, said Ernst, predictably!

The BBC regularly broadcasts these kind of anti-homeopathy, anti-alternative-medicine programmes, with never an attempt to redress the balance [2]. They will never broadcast a programme that provides an alternative medical view. The BBC appears to be firmly in the camp of the conventional medical establishment [2], and committed to providing time to anti-homeopaths without any ‘right of reply’.

Why, for example, was there no question about the quality of the ‘science’ Ernst is associated with?  Certainly, his science has come under serious scrutiny. For instance, I blogged about “The contribution of Professor Edzard Ernst to disinformation about Homeopathy” in September 1915 [!!!]. This followed an assessment made by Professor Robert Kahn about the quality of Ernst’s science. This was his conclusion [10].

“I have never seen a science writer so blatantly biased as Edzard Ernst: his work should not be considered of any worth at all, and discarded.”

Kahn’s paper shows, in his view, how ‘science’ has been taken over by ideology, (or as I suggested the financial interests of Big Corporations like Big Pharma). He revealed that in order to demonstrate homeopathy is ineffective over 95% of scientific research into homeopathy has to be discarded or removed! [10]

There was, of course, no mention of this in the BBC programme! [11]

So if Ernst’s change of mind was ‘scientific’, it was based on bad science [12], the kind of science much discussed in this blog, bought science, cheque book science, the kind of science based on university faculties funded by the pharmaceutical industry [13]. Ernst’s funding dried up when his academic position had become untenable [14], and he lost the support of his financial backers [15]. As my friends and colleague said, in response to the programme:

“Ernst’s religion is Science, not the well being of the patients. I wonder how many listeners will
be influenced by him as he does come across as an experienced and rational man?” 

I agree with her assessment. Anyone can come over as an ‘experience and rational man’ when given an uncritical platform, such as this BBC programme proved to be. Certainly, Peter Fisher, the Queen’s homeopath, was one of his main critics. Why, Lawson asked Ernst, did homeopathy have ‘such a grip’ on the Royal Family? Ernst did not know, but he did know that “when they get really ill they do not go to a homeopathy, otherwise they would not get so old!”

At this point I began to wonder on what knowledge Ernst used to know how the Royal Family were being treated, and scientific basis his belief that their longevity was nothing to do with homeopathy? The question was never asked, so we will, I fear, never know! [16] [1] you can listen to the programme here

[2] a serious allegation for which no evidence is provided, and I suppose none exists

[3] this is the truth

[4] not true, my experience was that patients got better for which there are good, scientifically sound explanations that do not involve homeopathy

[5] no, it’s not

[6] the best available evidence today which has little to do with ‘my’ science; might this be a little attempt at an ad hominem?

[7] no, science does understand the phenomena involved well: placebo, regression towards the mean, natural history of the disease etc.

[8] a wilful misinterpretation of my words

[9] no, this is not what I said, homeopathic remedies are ineffective and the observed effects are due to other phenomena

[10] not Kahn but Hahn; and his criticism is laughable, see here

[11] the programme is a series of interviews with people who have changed their mind on an important subject; such questions do not belong there

[12] any proof for that other than Hahn?

[13] false and libellous allegation

[14] no, when HRH had filed his complaint; this is all described in detail in my memoir

[15] poor logic: if I had been funded by the ‘enemies of homeopathy’, my funding should have increased

[16] anyone who follows the news bulletins about the Royals will know where they go when seriously ill.

4 Responses to Homeopathy, a method for turning truths into untruths?

  • I refer to Footnote 13 – As I said before, many allegations by homeopaths and altmeds are certainly false, and as far as I’m concerned libellous. I can only imagine that it’s the expense involved that precludes anyone being sued? Yesterday I read a list of 10 ‘Cancer Myths’ on the Cancer Research UK site, and then – as far as my patience lasted – a number of the accusations underneath that this organisation is merely a heavily-financed front for Big Pharma.

  • The BBC regularly broadcasts these kind of anti-homeopathy, anti-alternative-medicine programmes, with never an attempt to redress the balance.

    Personally, I get irritated with the BBC for endlessly broadcasting pro-homeopathy, pro-sCAM and pro-many other facets of pseudoscience programmes and interviews without any attempt to throw in a rational point of view. Objectively, this suggests the BBC overall has the ‘balance’ about right. But it’s frustrating that they don’t seem to broadcast anything about astrology or flat-earth theories: are there areas where our great national broadcaster accepts the weight of reason?

  • Sectarian medicine at its finest. There are people who agree with my beliefs, and people whoa re wrong, and that’s it. It is simply not possible for anyone to look at the evidence and come to any conclusion that conflicts with my beliefs, unless they are corrupt.

    It works for SCAM, it works for all other cults as well. Basically, Prof, they are calling you “suppressive”, in best Scientology form.

  • Maybe Steve Scrutton should have learned his lesson when he blogged about my criticism of him and got eviscerated as a consequence. It seems not. He can’t seem to help himself. The UK’s “answer” to Mike Adams, aka the “Health Ranger https://drpaulmorgan.wordpress.com/2015/09/14/a-homeopath-doesnt-like-being-called-out-for-promoting-misinformation/

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