MD, PhD, FMedSci, FRSB, FRCP, FRCPEd

One cannot very well write a blog about alternative medicine without giving full credit to the biggest and probably most determined champion of quackery who ever hugged a tree. Prince Charles certainly has done more than anyone else I know to let unproven treatments infiltrate real medicine. To honour his unique achievements, I am here presenting a fictitious interview with him. It never did take place, of course, and the questions I put to him are pure imagination. However, the ‘answers’ are in a way quite real: they have been taken unaltered from various speeches he made and articles he wrote. To avoid being accused of using dodgy sources which might have quoted him inaccurately or sympathetically, I have exclusively used HRH’s very own official website as a source for his comments. It seems safe to assume that HRH identifies with them more fully than with the many other statements he made on this subject.

I have not changed a single word in his statements and I have tried to avoid quoting him out of context; I did, however, take the liberty of putting sentences side by side which do not always originate from the same speech or article, i.e. I have used quotes from different communications to appear as though they originally were in sequence. It will be clear from the text that the fictitious interview is dated before Charles’ Foundation folded because of money laundering and fraud.

It is, of course, hugely tempting to comment on the various statements by Charles. However, I have resisted this temptation; I wanted the reader to enjoy his wisdom in its pure and unadulterated beauty. Anyone who feels like it will have plenty of opportunity to post comments, if they so wish.

To make clear what is what, my questions appear in italics, while his ‘answers’ are in Roman typeface.

 

Q I believe you have no training in science or medicine; yet you have long felt yourself expert enough to champion bizarre forms of therapies which many of our readers might call quackery.

As you know by now, this is an area to which I attach the greatest importance and where I have tried to make a particular contribution. For many years, the NHS has found complementary medicine an uncomfortable bedfellow – at best regarded as ‘fringe’ and in some quarters as ‘quack’; never viewed as a substitute for conventional medicine and rarely as a genuine partner in providing therapy.

I look back to the rather “lukewarm” response I received in 1983 as President of the British Medical Association when I first spoke about integration and complementary and alternative medicine. We have clearly travelled a very long way since that time.

Q Alternative medicine is mainly used by those who can afford it; at present, little of it is available on the NHS. Why do you want to change this situation? 

The very popularity of non-conventional approaches suggests that people are either dissatisfied with the kind of orthodox treatment they are receiving, or find genuine relief in such therapies. Whatever the case, it is only reasonable to try to identify the factors that are contributing to their increased use. And if advantages are found, clearly they should not be limited only to those people who can pay, but should be made more widely available on the NHS.

Q If with a capital “I”?

I believe it is because complementary and alternative approaches to healthcare bring a different emphasis to bear which often unlocks an individual’s inner resources to aid recovery or help to manage living with a serious chronic illness. It is also because complementary and alternative therapies often offer more effective and less intrusive ways of treating illness.

Q Really? Are you sure that they are more effective that conventional treatments? What is your evidence for that?

In 1997 the Foundation for Integrated Medicine, of which I am the president and founder, identified research and development based on rigorous scientific evidence as one of the keys to the medical establishment’s acceptance of non-conventional approaches. I believed then, as I do now, that the move to a more integrated provision of healthcare would ultimately benefit patients and their families.

Q But belief is hardly a good substitute for evidence. In this context, it is interesting to note that chiropractors and osteopaths received the same status as doctors and nurses in the UK. Is this another of your achievements? Was it based on belief or on evidence?

True healing is a synergy that comes not by courtesy of a medical diploma.

Q What do you mean?

As we know, the professions of Osteopathy and Chiropractice are now regulated in the same way as doctors and dentists, with their own Acts of Parliament. I’m very proud to have played a tiny role in trying to push for that Act of Parliament over the years. It has also been reassuring to see the progress being made by the other main complementary professions and I look forward to the further development of regulatory frameworks enabling high standards of training, clinical practice and professional behaviour.

Q Some might argue that statutory regulation made them not more professional but merely improved their status and thus prevented asking question about evidence. Why did they need to be regulated in that way?

The House of Lord’s Select Committee Report on Complementary and Alternative Medicine in 2000, quite sensibly recommended that only complementary professions which were statutorily regulated, or which had well-established arrangements for voluntary self-regulation, should be made available through the NHS.

Q Integrated healthcare seems to be your new buzz-word, what does it mean? Is it more than a passing fad?

Integrated Healthcare is, I believe, here to stay. The public want it and need it. It is not a takeover of the orthodox by CAM or the other way around, but is rather the bringing together of the best from both for the ultimate benefit of the patient.

Q Your lobby-group, Foundation for Integrated Medicine, what has it ever done to justify its existence?

In 1997 the steering group of The Foundation for Integrated Medicine (FIM), of which I am proud to be president, published a discussion document ‘Integrated Healthcare – A Way Forward for the Next Five Years?’

Q Sorry to interrupt, but if so many people are already using them, why do you feel compelled to promote unproven treatments even more? Why is ‘a way forward’ in promotion actually needed? Why did we need a lobby group like FIM?

Homoeopaths, osteopaths, reflexologists, acupuncturists, T’ai chi instructors, art therapists, chiropractors, herbalists and aromatherapists: these practitioners were working alongside NHS colleagues in acute hospitals, on children’s wards, in nursing homes and in particular in primary healthcare, in GP practices and health clinics up and down the country.

Q Exactly! Why then even more promotion of unproven treatments?

All well and good, perhaps, but if there are advantages in this approach, clearly they should not be limited only to those who can pay.

Q Yes, if again with a capital “I”, presumably . Anyway, do you believe these therapies should be tested like other treatments?

One of the obstacles always raised is that it is very difficult to trial complementary therapies in the rigorous randomised way that mainstream medicine deems to be the gold standard. This is ironic as there are, of course, un-evaluated orthodox practices which continue to be funded by the NHS.

Q Are you an expert on research methodology as well?

At the same time, we should be mindful that clinically controlled trials alone are not the only pre-requisites to apply a healthcare intervention. Consumer-based surveys can explore WHY people choose complementary and alternative medicine and tease out the therapeutic powers of belief and trust

These “rationalist selves” would be enormously relieved to see the effectiveness of these treatments proven through the “double-blind randomized controlled trial” – the gold-standard of medical research. However, we know that some complementary and alternative medicine disciplines (and indeed other forms of medical or surgical intervention) do not lend themselves to this research method.

Q Are you sure? This sounds like something someone who is ignorant of research methodology has told you.

… it has been suggested that we need a research method for complementary treatment that is, to use that awful expression, “fit for purpose”. Something that is entirely practical – what has been called “applied” research – which takes into account the whole person and the whole treatment as it is actually given in the surgery or the hospital. Something that might offer us a better idea of the cost-effectiveness of any given approach. It would also help to provide the right sort of evidence that health service commissioners require when they decide which services they wish to commission for their patients.

Q Hmm – anyway, would you promote unproven treatments even for serious conditions like cancer?

Two surveys have indicated that up to eighty per cent of cancer patients try alternative or complementary treatments at some stage following diagnosis and seventy-five per cent of patients would like to see complementary medicine available on the N.H.S.

Q Yes, but why the promotion?

There is a major role for complementary medicine in bowel cancer – as a support to more conventional approaches – in helping to prevent it through lifestyle changes, helping to boost our immune systems and in helping sufferers to come to terms with, and maintain, a sense of control over their own lives and wellbeing. My own Foundation For Integrated Medicine is, for example, involved in finding ways to integrate the best of complementary and alternative medicine.

Q And what do you understand by “the best”? In medicine, this term should mean “the most effective”, shouldn’t it?

Many cancer patients have turned to an integrated approach to managing their health, finding complementary therapies such as acupuncture, aromatherapy, reflexology and massage therapy extremely therapeutic. I know of one patient who turned to Gerson Therapy having been told that she was suffering from terminal cancer, and would not survive another course of chemotherapy. Happily, seven years later she is alive and well. So it is therefore vital that, rather than dismissing such experiences, we should further investigate the beneficial nature of these treatments.

Q Gerson? Is it ethical to promote an unproven starvation diet for cancer? 

…many patients use and believe in Gerson Therapy, yet more evidence needs to be available as to who might benefit or what adverse effects there might be. But, surely, we need to take a wider view of the most appropriate types of research methodology – a wider view of what research will help patients.

Q You are a very wealthy man; will you put your own money into the research that you regularly demand?

Complementary medicine is gaining a toehold on the rockface of medical science.

Q I beg your pardon.

Complementary medicine’s toehold is literally that, and it’s an inescapable fact that clinical trials, of the calibre that medical science demands, cost money. Figures from the Department of Complementary Medicine at the University of Exeter show that less than 8p out of every £100 of NHS funds for medical research was spent on complementary medicine. In 1998-99 the Medical Research Council spent no money on it at all, and in 1999 only 0.05% of the total research budget of UK medical charities went to this area.

Q HmmNature; you are very fond of all things natural, aren’t you?

The garden is designed to remind people of our interconnectedness with Nature and of the beneficial medicinal properties She provides through countless plants, flowers and trees. Throughout the 20th century so much ancient, accumulated, traditional wisdom has been thrown away – whether in the fields of medicine, architecture, agriculture or education. The baby was thrown out with the bathwater, so this garden is designed to bring the baby back again and to remind us of that priceless, traditional knowledge before we lose that rich store of Nature’s healing gifts for the benefit of our descendants.

When you think about it, what on earth is the point of throwing away our lifeline; of abandoning the priceless knowledge and wisdom accumulated over 1,000’s of years relating to the treatment of the human condition by natural means? It is sheer folly it seems to me to forget that we are a part of Nature and to imagine we can survive on this Earth as if we were merely a mechanical process divorced from, and in opposition to, the unity of the world around us.

Q …and herbalism?

Medical herbalists talk about ‘synergy’, the result of a complex mix of active ingredients in a plant that create a more powerful therapeutic effect together than if isolated. It’s a concept that has a wider application. As the 17th century poet John Donne famously wrote, “No man is an Island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the Continent, a part of the main.”

Q I am not sure I understand; what does that mean?

Medical herbalists, who make up their own preparations from combinations of fresh or dried plants, believe that this mix within individual herbs as well as in traditional mixtures of plant medicines creates what is called synergy, in which all the chemical components contribute to the remedy’s specific therapeutic effects.

At a time when farmers everywhere are struggling to make ends meet, the development of a natural pharmacy of organically grown herbs offers an alternative means of earning a living. Yet without protective measures, herbs are easily adulterated or their quality compromised.

Q …and homeopathy?

I went to open the new Glasgow Homeopathic Hospital for instance a couple of years ago, I met a whole lot of students who were studying homeopathy, I think, and I’ve never forgotten when they said to me ‘Are you interested in homeopathy’ and I thought – I don’t know, why do I bother?

Q And why exactly do you bother, if I may ask?

By allowing patients treatment choice, negative emotions can, in part, be alleviated. Many complementary practitioners provide time, empathy, hope and reassurance – skills that are referred to as the “human effect” – which can improve the confidence of cancer patients, alter mindsets and produce major positive changes in the immune system. As a result the “human effect” can greatly prolong life: it has been demonstrated that in a variety of cancers, such as breast cancer, that attitude of mind can not only raise the quality of life but in some cases can even prolong life. At the same time, we need specific treatments that are designed to improve the quality of patients’ lives, and to provide relief from the unpleasant symptoms of cancer – anxiety; pain; sleeplessness; skin irritation; poor appetite; nausea and depression, to name but a few.

Q At heart you seem to be a vitalist who believes in a vital force or energy that interconnects anything with everything and determines our health.

Research in the new field of psychoneuroimmunology – or mind-body medicine as it is sometimes called – is discovering that there is a constant interplay between our emotions, thoughts and actions and our body systems. It seems that the food we eat, the air we breathe, the exercise we take, our relationships with other people, all have a direct bearing on our health and natural healing processes. Complementary medicine has always known this and I believe it is one of the reasons for its enormous popularity.

Q Clarence House made several statements assuring the British public that you never overstep your constitutional role by trying to influence health politics; they were having us on, weren’t they?

A few days ago I launched an initiative to promote the provision of more complementary medicine in the NHS. For many years I have been working towards this goal.

Q Does that mean these statements were wrong?

I am convinced there is no better moment than now to create a real integration of our healthcare, particularly when there is talk of a Patient-Centred NHS. So much ill-health and disease is due to the misery, stress and alienation we see in our community.

14 Responses to A fictitious interview with the Prince Of Wales

  • You might fear you are headed for the Tower; but this sounds so authentic it deserves a knighthood. If only HRH – if he wants to take part in democratic debate (which he clearly does) – would actually take part in a discussion such as this instead of using his royalty to gain a platform and hiding behind it when it comes to serious interrogation.

    • I hope they have long visiting hours in the Tower!
      please do not pin your hopes too high for a knighthood….but I have to admit, it would be nice to receive the offer and refuse it.

  • Re: If with a capital “I”?

    Prince Charles implies in one of his ‘answers’ that the regulation of chiropractic enables “high standards of training, clinical practice and professional behaviour”, yet back in 2006 (five years after statutory regulation for chiropractors came into force) the General Chiropractic Council [GCC] declared the following:

    Quote
    If we are to provide a safe clinical experience for patients then a reporting procedure needs to be put in place, within the clinics and within the profession as a whole, which allows for adverse events and near misses to be shared on an anonymised basis so that we can all learn from them.”
    http://www.gcc-uk.org/files/link_file/C-020306-Open1.pdf (see Item 7)

    Well, here we are in 2013 and it looks like the GCC’s ‘If’ still stands…
    http://www.ebm-first.com/chiropractic/uk-chiropractic-issues/1888-british-chiropractic-association-members-attitudes-towards-the-chiropractic-reporting-and-learning-system-a-qualitative-study.html

  • It would be nice to see this published in the JRSM!

  • I’m surprised this hasn’t attracted more comments.

    I agree that it would be useful if HRH would desist from using his position to influence events and policies, as seems to be the case – witness the recent flurry of governmental activity to stop us from seeing what he writes to government departments. if I write to the government with a view on health matters. it will eventually be put into the public domain. Should be the same for everyone I think.

    By putting together this ‘interview; you will bring to the attention of many people who would not dream of checkcing HRH’s website (such as myself) some of the rather, shall we say, quaint ideas he propagates. One of the first and main things I was taught while undergoing education was to sort the anecdotal from the factual and statistically significant. This is sorely lacking in most of his undoubtedly well-intentioned pronouncements.

    So that’s a suite for two in the Tower. See you inside, perhaps, Prof Ernst?

  • Dear Prof. Dr. Ernst,
    On the topic of using Homeopathy to treat bowel cancer, I would like to draw your attention to this documentary from Australia.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QdLOBRUwq10

  • Of course the prince woffles on, but omits to say that many sex workers are excellent therapists.The knuckle cracking tricks of Thai women work magic on many people, but poitical correctness prevents or deters documentation. #NUAT

  • We need to take into account that despite the greatest education, Prince Charles is not the sharpest tool in the tool box. He earnt himself a 3rd class degree in an irrelevant subject at university whilst his police bodyguard who took the same course got a first.

  • Dear Prof Enerst
    Princess of Wales :True healing is a synergy that comes not by courtesy of a medical diploma.. That is no doubt true for healers such as a doctors but not true for a professor who is evidence based..Interested if anyone takes two jobs at the same time for instance doctor and professor, I believe it is very hard for them make everthing all right.

    I am an acupuncturist and epidemiologist. If a patient with NLBP to see me, I have no doubt to treat him with few needles and a few words but disregarded any meta analysis because my clinic experiences have shown one visit few needles are enough to relief the pain for a long period and no other method is better than my way. This is doctor job: an individual synergy from all kind of different situation. It works every day.

    If at this time I have to be an epidemiologist what I should do: stop treatment because of papers showing no evidence after comparison with sham Acupuncture.

    Can you tell me what we should do?

    • @Yawye

      “This is doctor job: an individual synergy from all kind of different situation. It works every day.”

      I once knew a garage mechanic who blamed every engine fault on the car’s electrics. He would replace the points, the spark plugs. the plug leads, the distributor and the coil before he looked at other possible causes — the carburettor, the fuel pump, the air filter, for example. He was working like your doctor: his garage experience showed that faults were most likely to be electrical. Now, might it not be better if this mechanic read up about some engine science and learned how to diagnose and treat faults more intellgently?

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