MD, PhD, MAE, FMedSci, FRSB, FRCP, FRCPEd.

Yes, I often moan about the abundance of poor-quality prevalence surveys that we are confronted with when scanning the literaturee on so-called alternative medicine (SCAM), e.g.:

Here is another example that recently appeared on my screen and that allows me to explain (yet again) why these surveys are such a waste of space:

The Use of Traditional and Complementary Medicine Among Patients With Multiple Sclerosis in Morocco

Let’s assume the survey is done perfectly (a condition that most are very far from meeting). If the information generated by such a perfect survey were worthwhile, we would also need to consider possible mutations that would be just as relevant:

  • We have just over 200 nations (other than Morocco) on the planet.
  • I assume there are about 1000 conditions (other than multiple sclerosis) for which SCAM is used.
  • There are, I estimate, 100 different definitions of SCAM (other than ‘traditional and complementary medicine’) that all include different modalities.

So, this alone would make 20 000 000 surveys that would be important enough to get published. But that’s not all. The usage and nature of SCAM change fairly quickly. That means we would need these 20 million surveys to be repeated every 2 to 3 years to be up-to-date.

For all this, we would need, I estimate, 200 000 research groups doing the work and about 20 000 SCAM journals to publish their results.

I think we can agree that this would be a nonsensical effort for producing millions of papers reaching dramatic conclusions that read something like this:

Our survey shows that patients suffering from xy  living in yz use much SCAM. This level of popularity suggests that SCAM is much appreciated and needs to be made available more widely and free of charge. 

I rest my case.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Subscribe via email

Enter your email address to receive notifications of new blog posts by email.

Recent Comments

Note that comments can be edited for up to five minutes after they are first submitted but you must tick the box: “Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.”

The most recent comments from all posts can be seen here.

Archives
Categories