MD, PhD, FMedSci, FRSB, FRCP, FRCPEd.

I have known for a long time that homeopathy can be dangerous, not least through the neglect of effective treatments for seriously ill patients. But I did not know that it can cause a bone fracture – until yesterday, that is.

Yes, you have understood me correctly! Here is the first case-report of a homeopathy-induced bone fracture:

My sister in law has two charming elderly ladies as neighbours. They are now in their 90ies and have, over the years, become very frail. She therefore has taken to looking after them where she can. Since the two sisters rarely leave their home these days, they have developed a new hobby: ordering things they find attractive through the post; it seems to be their greatest pleasure and has frequently led to complications that could easily fill a book of short stories.

Recently, an advertisement caught they eyes. It proclaimed in no uncertain terms that, even at their advanced age, they could re-gain some strength and energy through a specific homeopathic remedy (Boiron, I suspect, but I cannot be sure). This, of course, sounded far too good to not give it a try, and the two sisters promptly ordered what seemed to the the answer to their prayers.

The little package arrived yesterday, and the excitement must have been palpable. The more impatient of the two sisters insisted to try the wonder drug straight away. With her hands shaking in anticipation, she opened the tiny vial of globuli. Overwhelmed by trepidation, she spilled the entire content of globuli on the floor.

‘That’s bad but not disastrous’, she thought. Trying to pick them up, she stepped on some of them. As our frail hero weighs not even 50kg, the globuli acted like the ball-bearings or a pair of roller-skates. Her feet flew off, she lost her balance and landed abruptly and painfully on her side under the kitchen table covered by a table lamp and a chair.

The second sister rushed to help but proved to be too frail to get the patient back on her feet. This is when my sister in law was phoned and, ignoring the current lock-down, arrived with her husband to the rescue. What they saw was a scene of utter devastation: Globuli everywhere, their elderly neighbour moaning on the floor covered with various items she has tried to hold on to when attempting to prevent the fall. Together they managed to get the patient back up, but soon realised that she was badly injured. An ambulance was called and in the local hospital an X-ray confirmed the diagnosis: rib fracture.

I am glad to say, the old lady – my best wishes to her and her sister! – is now back home and recovering well. Little does she know that she is about to enter the history books of medicine as the first ever documented case of ‘homeopathy-induced rib fracture’.

5 Responses to Homeopathy-induced bone fracture – a hitherto unknown complication of homeopathy

  • For which diagnosis a radiograph was not necessary and not usually carried out nowadays.
    A homeopathic radiograph!

  • I wonder if they were taking homeopathic calcium supplements.

  • This somehow reminds me of this homeopathic remedy for drowning: Once you have extracted the drowning victim from the water and ‘diagnosed’ the victim as (and please bear with me, I’m not making this up) cold and blue, covered with clammy sweat(*), [with] rattling respiration, and alerted emergency services, you are supposed to pour sugar pellets down the poor sod’s throat? For god’s sake WHY!? To finish the job? Has anyone told these idiots how dangerous it is to feed anything to people who are semi-conscious, especially if they’re not breathing properly?

    *: The cold and blue thing I can somehow imagine, even though a blue hue is usually not accompanied by any sort of breathing at all any more, rattling or not – but how on earth am I to diagnose clammy sweat on someone who by definition is soaking wet to begin with?

    Homeopaths must be the stupidest people on this planet.

  • Horrific! Be sure to write that up for the NHS so they have another excuse to eliminate free choice for medical care.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Recent Comments

Note that comments can be edited for up to five minutes after they are first submitted but you must tick the box: “Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.”

The most recent comments from all posts can be seen here.

Archives
Categories