MD, PhD, FMedSci, FSB, FRCP, FRCPEd

This post was inspired by a shiatsu-practitioner who recently commented on this blog. As I have not yet written a post about shiatsu, I think this might be a good occasion to do so. On one of the websites of the said practitioner – who claimed to have such amazing powers that hewould be locked up or worse“, if he made them public - explains that Shiatsu is a form of natural healing therapy that promotes health through finger pressure along energy meridians or channels – like acupuncture but with no needles and all your clothes on. Shiatsu is a combination of ancient theories of oriental medicine and ‘energy’, with modern knowledge of anatomy and physiology. Shiatsu originated in Japan where it is officially recognised and parents teach their children to treat them. Shiatsu is one of the fastest growing areas of complementary therapy in the UK. Shiatsu is safe and non-invasive. Shiatsu is a holistic therapy which means your whole body is treated. Work on your energy channels promotes well-being at the physical and emotional levels and stimulates your natural self-healing processes. The application of pressure and gentle stretching helps relieve muscle tension, joint stiffness and to realign body structures. Contact with the energy pathways helps to correct imbalance in the functioning of internal organs and to re-balance the effects of emotional disturbance. You don’t have to be ill to enjoy Shiatsu, many people enjoy it simply because it is deeply relaxing.

I also looked up another of his websites and found that he claims to treat the following conditions:

  • Anger Management
  • Anxiety and Stress
  • Arthritis
  • Back pain
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Breathing/respiratory problems
  • Cancer
  • Confidence issues
  • Depression
  • Digestive Disorders
  • Eating Disorders
  • Eczema
  • Emotional Issues
  • Fears and Phobias
  • Headache
  • Indigestion
  • Infertility
  • Insomnia
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • Joint Pain
  • Low energy/Lethargy
  • Low Self-Esteem
  • ME/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  • Migraine
  • Muscular Tension
  • Nausea and sickness
  • Nightmares
  • Obesity
  • Pain
  • Panic Attacks
  • Sciatica
  • Sexual problems
  • Sinus problems
  • Skin conditions
  • Sleeping problems
  • Social anxiety disorder
  • Spiritual Issues
  • Stiffness/Tension
  • Weight problems

Impressed by this list, I looked at similar sites and found that such extravagant claims seem more the rule than the exception in the world of shiatsu. Such therapeutic claims came as a big surprise to me: the last time we reviewed the evidence, we had concluded: NO CONVINCING DATA AVAILABLE TO SUGGEST THAT SHIATSU IS EFFECTIVE FOR ANY CONDITION.

But that was 5 years ago; perhaps there have been major advances since? To find out, I did a quick Medline search and – BINGO! – found a recent systematic review entitled “The evidence for Shiatsu: a systematic review of Shiatsu and acupressure“. It was authored by proponents of this therapy and can therefore not be suspected to be riddled with ‘anti-shiatsu bias’ (I just love the give-away title THE EVIDENCE FOR SHIATSU….!). These authors found that “Shiatsu studies comprised 1 RCT, three controlled non-randomised, one within-subjects, one observational and 3 uncontrolled studies investigating mental and physical health issues. Evidence was of insufficient quantity and quality” The only RCT included in their review was not actually a study of shiatsu but of a complex mixture of treatments including shiatsu for back and neck pain. No significant effects compared to standard care were identified in this study.

So, what does that tell us about shiatsu? It clearly tells us that it is an unproven therapy. And what does that say about shiatsu-practitioners who make multiple claims about treating serious conditions? I think I can leave it to my readers to answer this question.

25 Responses to Shiatsu: holistic therapy, naive nonsense or malicious quackery?

  • I was confused by the headline at first–I thought it was about the dog breed (shih tzu)!

  • The inventor of Shiatsu, Tokujiro Namikoshi (1905-2000), was the reincarnation of a high-ranking Buddhist monk who healed many people, according to a village monk who took Namikoshi under his wing. Namikoshi later developed a “scientific theory” to explain his anecdotal evidence for healing using his hands and, of course, turned Shiatsu into a business.

    Shiatsu can treat Spiritual Issues? Well, it obviously failed to cure Namikoshi’s.

    • @Pete

      I think I’d prefer to rely on a sweet cuddly shih tzu than shiatsu for my “spiritual issues” :-)

      • @Irene
        I agree (nearly added that to my comment as you’d mentioned the dog breed).

        I much prefer talking to a dog than a deity — dogs respond occasionally :-)

  • What I find quite interesting is the hostility you portray towards anything other than medicine that is accepted by Western Society. Placebo effects are shunned and anything currently lacking in evidence is automatically placed in the ‘not effective’ category of medicine. While Shiatsu is not based on western practice, nor has it been around for very long, the theory on which it is based pre-dates our own modern practice by thousands of years. That leaves thousands of years for the evolution of medicine which presents itself today as Shiatsu and Acupuncture, to name but two treatments. And of the two, Acupuncture is the practice most accepted by the medical profession and society as a whole. Why? One possibility could be that some practitioners have westernised their treatments, changing jargon such as ‘chi manipulation of the acupoints’ to ‘pressure points, when manipulated, cause physiological changes in certain areas of the body’. Another could be that the use of props, such as the needles and tables similar to those used in western medicine, establish an authoritative practice in the eyes of society. Again, both points lead to westernisation. While this is great for the practitioner, it steers the practice away from its’ roots. And the roots are what made Acupuncture what it is. The roots that Shiatsu practitioners still follow, yet receive no recognition for it. Do you see what I’m getting at?

    The research that is brought to the table regarding Shiatsu has been carried out in a mediocre way at best. If someone was to take the practice seriously instead of condemning it on sight and perform a professional study, one conducted with a lack of bias and flaws reduced through objectiveness, who knows what we may see? There have been studies conducted which provide evidence to suggest that there are energy pathways in our bodies, they even came with pictures.
    Such as one by HU Xianglong, WU Bao-hua and WANG Pei-qing of the Fujian Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou 350003, CHINA. Here is a wonderful compilation of research, along with an explanation of the study I have just stated, with regards to Acupuncture and meridians that have put it better than I ever could: http://www.morleyacupunctureclinic.co.uk/clinical%20inf.htm

    Yet they have failed to reach the population through being ignored and labelled as having one flaw or another in order to disregard the results. People are ready to yell ‘lack of scientific evidence!’ but when presented with such are just as ready to shun it when the evidence is contradictory to their own beliefs. I do agree that there is a lack of evidence and that Shiatsu is an un-proven therapy. However, this doesn’t prove its’ effectiveness or lack thereof, just that there isn’t any ‘accepted’ proof yet. If you do not believe in alternative medicine, that is completely fine. But maybe taking a more objective and less of a subjective approach to your ‘critical analysis’ may lead to a higher state of professionalism.

    I will leave you with this final note. It is expected that all medicine must go through trials that are acknowledged as being scientifically conducted. Interestingly, one such medication, Thalidomide, passed through the trials and was then sold to pregnant women to relieve morning sickness. The result of this was thousands of babies being born with deformities. The medication was taken off the shelves and re-evaluated. Maybe crying out for scientific evidence through scientifically acknowledged trials is not all that it is made out to be. Surely, if anything, you could agree on the fact of there being an obvious gap in the way research is conducted? Maybe a holistic approach to medicine research could have avoided these results? Who knows? Because as you say, there is ‘no convincing data to suggest [otherwise]‘.

    • Laura said:

      What I find quite interesting is the hostility you portray towards anything other than medicine that is accepted by Western Society.

      No. The tendency is to reject treatments for which no good evidence has been provided.

      Placebo effects are shunned

      No. They are recognised for what they are.

      anything currently lacking in evidence is automatically placed in the ‘not effective’ category of medicine.

      You got that right. Can you give any good reason why something lacking in evidence should be classed as ‘effective’?

      While Shiatsu is not based on western practice, nor has it been around for very long, the theory on which it is based pre-dates our own modern practice by thousands of years.

      Ignoring the logical fallacy of appeal to antiquity, can you say why this theory is still just a theory after thousands of years?

      That leaves thousands of years for the evolution of medicine which presents itself today as Shiatsu and Acupuncture, to name but two treatments. And of the two, Acupuncture is the practice most accepted by the medical profession and society as a whole. Why?

      A very good question. Since the best evidence to date does not show that acupuncture is effective for very much at all, I’d suggest any [previous popularity might have been due to poor quality trials and good marketing.

      One possibility could be that some practitioners have westernised their treatments, changing jargon such as ‘chi manipulation of the acupoints’ to ‘pressure points, when manipulated, cause physiological changes in certain areas of the body’.

      No. Using different words doesn’t change the lack of good evidence. But it might make more appealing to potential customers.

      Another could be that the use of props, such as the needles and tables similar to those used in western medicine, establish an authoritative practice in the eyes of society.

      Now you may be getting somewhere: the non-specific effects can be quite significant. But that still doesn’t change the lack of much good evidence for specific effects.

      Again, both points lead to westernisation.

      ‘Westernisation’ is just a word that has more marketing meaning than medical meaning.

      While this is great for the practitioner, it steers the practice away from its’ roots. And the roots are what made Acupuncture what it is. The roots that Shiatsu practitioners still follow, yet receive no recognition for it. Do you see what I’m getting at?

      No.

      The research that is brought to the table regarding Shiatsu has been carried out in a mediocre way at best. If someone was to take the practice seriously instead of condemning it on sight and perform a professional study, one conducted with a lack of bias and flaws reduced through objectiveness, who knows what we may see?

      Who do you think should be responsible for conducting those studies and how should they be done?

      There have been studies conducted which provide evidence to suggest that there are energy pathways in our bodies, they even came with pictures.

      Please provide links to peer reviewed journals where these claims have been published.

      Such as one by HU Xianglong, WU Bao-hua and WANG Pei-qing of the Fujian Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou 350003, CHINA. Here is a wonderful compilation of research, along with an explanation of the study I have just stated, with regards to Acupuncture and meridians that have put it better than I ever could: http://www.morleyacupunctureclinic.co.uk/clinical%20inf.htm

      That is an opinion piece on a website that appears to show some body surface temperature thermographs. Do you understand why a critical thinker might not be entirely convinced by that?

      Yet they have failed to reach the population through being ignored and labelled as having one flaw or another in order to disregard the results.

      so, should we ignore flaws and accept the results from flawed experiments?

      People are ready to yell ‘lack of scientific evidence!’ but when presented with such are just as ready to shun it when the evidence is contradictory to their own beliefs.

      No, it’s because no good evidence has been provided.

      I do agree that there is a lack of evidence and that Shiatsu is an un-proven therapy. However, this doesn’t prove its’ effectiveness or lack thereof, just that there isn’t any ‘accepted’ proof yet.

      I’m glad you agree there is a lack of evidence, but what do you think we should do while we’re waiting for that good evidence to be provided?

      If you do not believe in alternative medicine, that is completely fine.

      To the impartial observer, belief has nothing to do with it. To the practitioner, belief might have everything to do with it. I hope you can see the difference?

      But maybe taking a more objective and less of a subjective approach to your ‘critical analysis’ may lead to a higher state of professionalism.

      It’s the objective approach that leads to the conclusion there is no good evidence for shiatsu and that is the correct, scientific conclusion to come to until such time as the objective evidence changes.

      I will leave you with this final note. It is expected that all medicine must go through trials that are acknowledged as being scientifically conducted. Interestingly, one such medication, Thalidomide, passed through the trials and was then sold to pregnant women to relieve morning sickness. The result of this was thousands of babies being born with deformities. The medication was taken off the shelves and re-evaluated. Maybe crying out for scientific evidence through scientifically acknowledged trials is not all that it is made out to be. Surely, if anything, you could agree on the fact of there being an obvious gap in the way research is conducted? Maybe a holistic approach to medicine research could have avoided these results? Who knows? Because as you say, there is ‘no convincing data to suggest [otherwise]‘.

      Yes, that was dreadful. But it demonstrates your lack of understanding of what has changed since and your lack of understanding of what trials can and cannot do. However, none of this changes the lack of evidence for shiatsu or acupuncture, don’t you agree?

      • ‘Westernisation’ is just a word that has more marketing meaning than medical meaning.”

        That’s not actually true. Eastern & western medicine look at things very differently.

        • No. ‘Looking at things differently’ is meaningless – what specific insight does a non-western way of looking at things give?

          • Eastern & western medicine systems are different enough that they’re almost polar opposites. Which is a good thing.

            ‘Meaningless’ is an interesting way of looking at it. Personally, I think it’s fantastic that we now have access to different ways of looking health and medicine. Each system has its strengths and weaknesses, and one tends to pick up where the other leaves off. Hardly meaningless, to those of us that take advantage of the strengths of each system.

          • Eastern & western medicine systems are different enough that they’re almost polar opposites. Which is a good thing.

            ‘Meaningless’ is an interesting way of looking at it. Personally, I think it’s fantastic that we now have access to different ways of looking health and medicine. Each system has its strengths and weaknesses, and one tends to pick up where the other leaves off. Hardly meaningless, to those of us that take advantage of the strengths of each system.

            Perhaps you can enlighten us .
            The non-different medicine (the one that your “different one” is a polar opposite to) we know is as a matter of fact not perfect but works so well that it has constantly improved itself for the past 200 years and is responsible for many saved lives, less suffering and a doubled life expectancy as well as freedom from many catastrophes a such as pest and cholera.
            What are the main strengths and progress of the “different” way of looking at health and medicine. What has happened that is positive with the other way and what are its biggest accomplishments?

  • I find it sadly humerous when people who claim to be scientists say that shiatsu, Chinese medicine, or any other traditional medicine practice is “unscientific”.

    Science:
    • the intellectual and practical activity encompassing the systematic study of the structure and behavior of the physical and natural world through observation and experiment: the world of science and technology.
    • a particular area of this: veterinary science | the agricultural sciences.
    • a systematically organized body of knowledge on a particular subject: the science of criminology.

    Of course all of these traditional practices are scientific. Traditional Greek medicine uses a system a bit different that traditional Chinese, Thai different than Ayurvedic, etc etc. But all systems are based on codifying the natural world, trying to understand patterns, and to restore balance in sytems that have gone awry. The modern western system is just another one (although quite different) in the chain.

    To think that any one of them understands things better than the other is dangerously arrogant.

    Mixing and matching (MDs doing a weekend workshop on acupuncture, acupuncturists doing a heart transplant) is criminally foolish.

    Trying to make sense of a traditional practice without understanding the science they are based on – including literacy in the technical language – will give you trivial results at best. Most often, it leads to sloppy treatments that can lead to chronic conditions. If you’re going to study Chinese medical theory, for instance, learn what the term ‘qi’ means. Learn what ‘yin/yang’ means. I heard an MD claim that “yin/yang theory is nonsense”. Really? I doubt he really believes that. More than likely it’s ignorance of the term, since it basically means a system for comparing things. If that doctor couldn’t look at blood pressure and compare the results to ‘normal’ (in other words, practicing yin/yang theory)…now we’re talking Quack. Anyone that says “there is no wind in the heart” does not think that blood moves. Or (more likely) they don’t understand the terms.

    To say that “x system” doesn’t work because there is no modern western clinical evidence – that’s just a current form of superstition. If you want to study the effectiveness of traditional therapies – learn the traditional science and traditional scientific terminology. Otherwise, you’re practicing sloppy psuedo-science.

    • so there is “western” evidence and …eastern???
      are you sure – I thought evidence is evidence!

      • Yes – if you look at something like guasha, for instance, the markings that come up would be evidence of heat being removed, or cold being removed, or whatever the marks indicate. (you would evaluate color, quality, pattern, etc). As far as I know, the modern western system doesn’t measure the removal of “the effects of the cold” – in that way.

        I bet it’s possible, but you would have to have someone literate in both systems to be clear that apples were being compared to apples.

        • So, when evaluating the effects of GuaSha injuries and other “eastern” wonders , you have to enter another world, governed by completely different laws of nature, right?

          There is a simple and fully plausible explanation to this “alternative other world”. It has been illustrated brilliantly by a team of experts in the video linked below. In the video they use another of those alternative therapies as an example, which has the same effects albeit not usually called eastern but it is governed by the same alternative laws of nature.
          The expert team has coined a term for what you and others are doing / experiencing when you are in this alternative world experiencing the positive effects of the alternative laws of nature. Alas this term is not safe on a public web open to minors. I will give you a hint so you understand when you watch the video: Two words both starting with an “M”.

          You should watch the whole thing. It is quite enlightening. It even shows a couple of scientific experiments illustrating the workings of these alternative laws of nature.

          The video

          • @Bjorn – I’ll make you a deal. I’ll watch your video after you learn something about traditional medicine theory, and specifically gua sha. Or at least the first thing about it…which would be “gua”. What you describe as “gua” is pretty much the opposite.

            Backing your complete misunderstanding with your “medical knowledge” on a public web space is not safe for minors, or anyone else. You are pretending to have knowledge on a subject, that you do not possess.

            I’m pretty sure there’s a term for that…

  • I just want to say, I think this article was written in anger toward a particularly eccentric individual who had a particularly esoteric perspective on the world. If you dig a little deeper in your research, you’ll learn that Namikoshi Shiatsu is based solely on western science. The reason it is an unproven therapy is because there hasn’t been many studies on the subject. However it’s safe to assume that as a form of manual therapy, it likely has similar benefits to acupressure or conventional massage, and considering the manipulative techniques used in a therapist’s attempt to mobilize joints, it’s possible that it share similar benefits to physical therapy. My point is Tokujiro Namikoshi’s Shiatsu was based on scientifically sound principles.

    It was one of his students, Shizuto Masunaga who decided to introduce meridians into the treatment. Masunaga started the offshoot called Zen Shiatsu in the west. Other styles focused on eastern medicine and philosophy came from this lineage. Namikoshi’s Shiatsu, however, is still prominent today and represents the firm scientific basis on which the practice stands. It isn’t hiding, Shiatsu is waiting to be tested.

    This article was clearly writen as an attack on an individual who made outrageous claims and openly criticized you. It is currently being cited as a source for the wikipedia page for shiatsu. Which when you read this article is obviously ridiculous as it’s based on a crazy person’s website!

    All I ask of you being a researcher and a respected author is to take an unbiased stance and delve deep enough in your research to understand what it actually is you are writing about. At the very least refrain from turning an article about thousands of peoples’ professions into an attack against one crazy jerk.

    I respect your work, but like I said, this ended up on the wikipedia page. What you say has weights and affects many honest people. This post was very unprofessional and inconsiderate to legitimate professionals of a valid and effective albeit unscientifically-proven form of manual therapy.

    Please realize what you have done here and stop it.

    • if it’s unproven, how can you say it is effective?

    • Prof Ernst’s reply gets right to the heart of the problem with your comment, but I’d like to go into a bit more detail…

      Alex said:

      I just want to say, I think this article was written in anger toward a particularly eccentric individual who had a particularly esoteric perspective on the world.

      I see no anger. What I see is a careful analysis of the claims made by a practitioner. perhaps you could point out something you believe shows this anger?

      If you dig a little deeper in your research, you’ll learn that Namikoshi Shiatsu is based solely on western science.

      Perhaps you could point to this science?

      The reason it is an unproven therapy is because there hasn’t been many studies on the subject.

      Why is that? Do you agree that a practitioner should only make claims that are backed by good evidence?

      However it’s safe to assume that as a form of manual therapy, it likely has similar benefits to acupressure or conventional massage, and considering the manipulative techniques used in a therapist’s attempt to mobilize joints, it’s possible that it share similar benefits to physical therapy.

      No, it’s not a safe assumption until someone can provide good reasoning, backed by good evidence. So far, that seems to be lacking.

      My point is Tokujiro Namikoshi’s Shiatsu was based on scientifically sound principles.

      But no one has detailed those “scientifically sound principles”.

      It was one of his students, Shizuto Masunaga who decided to introduce meridians into the treatment. Masunaga started the offshoot called Zen Shiatsu in the west. Other styles focused on eastern medicine and philosophy came from this lineage. Namikoshi’s Shiatsu, however, is still prominent today and represents the firm scientific basis on which the practice stands. It isn’t hiding, Shiatsu is waiting to be tested.

      See my comments above about evidence.

      This article was clearly writen as an attack on an individual who made outrageous claims and openly criticized you.

      No. It is an attack on the claims made and the lack of evidence to substantiate them.

      It is currently being cited as a source for the wikipedia page for shiatsu. Which when you read this article is obviously ridiculous as it’s based on a crazy person’s website!

      That’s surely a defamatory statement and un-called for.

      All I ask of you being a researcher and a respected author is to take an unbiased stance and delve deep enough in your research to understand what it actually is you are writing about.

      I think Prof Ernst understands it very well. But perhaps you could point out anything Prof Ernst got wrong?

      At the very least refrain from turning an article about thousands of peoples’ professions into an attack against one crazy jerk.

      It is an attack on the claims and the evidence, not the practitioner.

      I respect your work, but like I said, this ended up on the wikipedia page.

      That’s hardly anything to do with Prof Ernst – anyone is free to edit Wikipedia pages (with some exceptions).

      What you say has weights and affects many honest people.

      Good. I hope they take note of the evidence for the claims that were made.

      This post was very unprofessional and inconsiderate to legitimate professionals of a valid and effective albeit unscientifically-proven form of manual therapy.

      Well, you’ve answered your own question there…

      Please realize what you have done here and stop it.

      That’s entirely up to Prof Ernst, of course, but can you say why anyone should not point out claims that are not substantiated by good evidence?

      One last question: if there is so little good evidence, what are practitioners doing about it? Are they funding research and are they currently limiting their claims to the evidence? If not, why not?

  • Energy Medicine has become a big business in the U.S., and such a political force in the world of Massage Therapy, that practitioners who don’t buy it are cowed into silence. Very few dare to challenge the dogma.

  • As someone who has been in the Natural Medicine industry for 23 years I felt obliged to comment:

    Few people realize that most modern day mainstream therapies such as Swedish massage, pressure point therapy, rolfing, physiotherapy, chiropractic, osteopathy, therapeutic touch… the list goes on, all have there origins in traditional eastern medicine and bodywork… all that has happened is the repackaging, rebranding and relabeling for the western mind.

    So to suggest that natural/alternative/traditional/Japanese/Chinese medicine etc is a sham only insults the very foundation to which most of modern Western medicine is built on and subsequently reveals the extent of the authors ignorance.

    In reality these natural medicines have been practiced since the dawn of human kind and then comes along the infant medicine only 400ish years old – so which one is really the alternative.

    In regards to science and scientists well just look at all the corruption. Independent studies who really pays for them. The Pharmaceutical cartels who have vested interests of course to put everything that really works down so they can promote patented drugs and treatments and cash out their chips.

    If you are real doctors and scientists then you should know that more than 80% of all sickness/disease/illness is either diet or lifestyle related. So please tell the world public how in the hell can you correct a nutritional deficiency with drug therapy. The body needs essential nutrients – not synthetic chemicals. How can you get people exercising with drug therapy or surgery – ah that’s right you cant.

    And why your at it: lets not forget that Modern Medicine is the 3rd leading cause of death in the world. Look up Iatrogenic Disease maybe the author should write an article about that.

    Cures for every disease including Cancer Already Exist, But not in the Realm of Chemical-based Medicine:
    Don’t let organized medicine send you on a fool’s errand chasing rainbows. Cancer is not a pharmacological problem. It cannot be solved by applying prescription drugs (synthetic chemistry) to the body. And it most certainly cannot be solved by poisoning the body (chemotherapy) further. “You cannot drug a body into health.”

    Nature gives us an array of tools to reverse disease and the underlying causes that eventually lead to cancer, including whole foods, vitamins, minerals, supplements and healthy lifestyle choices (this is what the sick body really needs). The key is not merely addressing the symptoms of disease, but addressing and eliminating the root causes that led to cancer to begin with.

    I have personally witnessed hundreds of people heal, recover, and turn there life around from life threatening diseases using what you have labeled “naive nonsense or malicious quackery”… Professional Natural Therapists/practitioners call it common sense.

    I have also witnessed thousands of people go the drug therapy/surgery/chemotherapy route and got sicker and sicker and sicker and yep sadly eventually died. But of course it was the cancer that killed them not the toxic chemo over doses that overrode there already frail bodies? not to mention drain the families bank account!!!

    Personally and professionally I am insulted by the level of disinformation being perpetrated throughout this site.

    Shiatsu is a powerful holistic therapy that indeed works…
    Anyone who says otherwise has not really tried it by the hands of a specialist or better yet dig a little deeper and you’ll find them on 5 to 8 different types of medications being ravaged by side effects wondering why they are not seeing results.

    Go natural or go medical. Either Rely on your bodies inherent self-healing/regulating capacity under the guidance of a professional Natural Health Therapist or get poked, prodded and radiated into oblivion by machines and robots. It is of course an individual decision.

    Everyone chooses the natural route eventually, but for some people whom are told “there’s nothing else we can do” its already far too late.

    Here’s the science that your article lacks:

    The power of Shiatsu in hospitals_part01
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6Ac9beRTIw

    The power of Shiatsu in hospitals_part02
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQZDBXtdqV0

    :)

    • science?
      are you sure?
      I don’t see science in what you refer to.

      • Of course you wouldn’t
        Your paid not to…

        Real healing doesn’t happen in a lab under a microscope!
        It happens in peoples lives, in their hearts, minds and spirit overtime as they change their diet, lifestyle, habits, behaviours and beliefs to a more healthier, vibrant, natural, sustainable way of existence. A re-education if you will.

        The Greatest Medicine of all, is to teach people how not to need it…
        – Sushruta, Ayurvedic physician [600 B.C.] –

        And this is where Shiatsu as a powerful Holistic Therapy outshines the rest.

        :)

  • CJ, you are so clueless… On everything you said. You clearly know nothing of medicine, nothing on how science work, and even nothing on how world and nature work. You talk about desinformation, I pity you because i think you are genuine.

    Most of “bad modern drug” you are talking about are in fact purified and isolated compounds found in nature, they don’t come from nowhere. Chemicals don’t give a damn about they come from nature or from a lab, they got the same structure and the same property. Natural herbal based remedies can have a lot of side effects too, that’s not a particularity of “synthetic chimical”.

    Then I’ll will make an example : I’ll break your arm with a rock, and then you got an open wound with blood flowing and horrendous pain. Now you can shiatsuing your wound and see what happen or go surgery. Really, let’s do this experiment anytime anywhere, the result might get you out of your cognitive dissonance. Now the same is true with any infectious disease, i’ll get get you some salmonella or anything and what shiatsu is doing about vomiting everywhere and terrible diarhea. Or you will take a vaccine and get nothing. Now dare to say that there is no good in modern medicine, in drug and surgery !

    By the way all of the modern medicine IS based on the natural ability of the body to protect and heal himself (vaccine work only because of the immune system memory), drug usually stimulates skill and ability of precise body cells. Chemo drug can be immunotherapy, entirely based on the “natural” principe of immunity. Even H2O2 one the most common bactericid used in medicine is also used by cytotoxic cells in human body ! And I could could continue the list forever… I don’t even understand your “How can you get people exercising with drug therapy or surgery – ah that’s right you cant.” why in the world could you not go for an healthy life or exercising with surgery or modern medicine ? You get advertising EVERYWHERE saying people have to do exercising and eat well, you will not see any medic say that’s not important, and all of them will recommend it to you if you ask them. You are just inventing yourself a new reality.

    And please cut the bullshit about “the pharmaceutical cartel blablabla”, medicine saved billions of lives you just have to read about. You should start by studying nature before talking about.

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